• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

How do I execute a.out?

This topic is 5588 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Im new to linux, and I compiled a simple program for it with gcc (a hello world of sorts), and it went to a.out -- but I can''t figure out how to run this... Im running redhat8.0, with XWindow 4.2x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
./a.out
In Linux, the current directory isn''t usually in the search path, so you need to specify where the executable is with the ./

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
type this in your fav. shell
"a.out" and perss enter
or "./a.out" and press enter
ofcourse you need to be in the same dir. as a.out file is

to find it just type "find ~/ -iname "a.out"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In the console window, type ./a.out



God puts an apple tree in the middle of the Garden of Eden and says, do what you like guys, oh, but don''t eat the apple. Surprise surprise, they eat it and he leaps out from behind a bush shouting "Gotcha." It wouldn''t have made any difference if they hadn''t eaten it... because if you''re dealing with somebody who has the sort of mentality which likes leaving hats on the pavement with bricks under them you know perfectly well they won''t give up. They''ll get you in the end. -- Douglas Adams

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess that is doing it -- but why would the following program

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
printf("look -- Im using printf");
return 0;
}

do nothing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thry this instead

printf("look -- Im using printf\n");

... you need to print before your buffer is filled up, so just use special char ''\n'' for that, it''s the new line char.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow, look at hte posts above. 4 of them within 32 seconds of each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Viro
Wow, look at hte posts above. 4 of them within 32 seconds of each other.

Yeah.

DarkHamster:
Hopefully by now you also know that you can specify the name for your compiler output file using the -o (lowercase! uppercase is for optimization level) option:

gcc hello.c -o hello

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by necromancer_df
also if you "chmod +x " you won''t have to write ./ to execute your program as it sets the file as executable.

No connection. The fact that the ./ is required is due to the fact that the current working directory is by default no in the PATH environment variable.
In fact, if the file wasn''t already executable(gcc sets this) he wouldn''t be able to execute the file with or without the ./





God puts an apple tree in the middle of the Garden of Eden and says, do what you like guys, oh, but don''t eat the apple. Surprise surprise, they eat it and he leaps out from behind a bush shouting "Gotcha." It wouldn''t have made any difference if they hadn''t eaten it... because if you''re dealing with somebody who has the sort of mentality which likes leaving hats on the pavement with bricks under them you know perfectly well they won''t give up. They''ll get you in the end. -- Douglas Adams

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement