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Aerolithe

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Hi, I just registered and I am a total newbie to game development. My first question is do you think that books are worth buying, or is it easier to just look up the information on the internet. I have seen a lot of tutorials on the internet for various things like programming and I've seen some pretty bad book reviews and I just wanted to know what you guys think since your the ones who are either doing this stuff or have done this in the past. ~Aerolithe (New, improved signature comming soon. Release date in late 2003, but expect delays and cut out features) [edited by - Aerolithe on November 5, 2002 9:13:33 PM]

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Thanks, I was just reading some of the tutorials for beginners and it also recomends books. One of the biggest advantages is I don''t have to sit on the computer to learn, although I can''t get very far into it without using the computer anyway. All I need now is a steady source of income and I''m all set to get started, the only thing missing is an employer, but thats getting off topic. Do you know if I can generally get educational versions of software on my own without anything school related, my schools most advanced course is computer software 1, where I am currently learning PowerPoint (soooo hard ) and have managed to stay above a 100% the whole year so far.

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quote:
Original post by nickmerritt
Books are worth the gold you pay for them. Don''t try to learn direct X for the Docs that come with it. But hey, thats how I got programming.
Nick


Hey now, that''s how I learned

But seriously, you''ll save yourself one hell of a headache if you get the books. I never got any books on programming, just dove head-first into the vast (and I do mean vast) unknown. Well, a little over a year and I''ve started to learn asm to optimize my code. Though I must admit it wasn''t exactly the easiest year of my life, what with college shoving me in the back and all.

Bottom line is get books unless you really feel adventurous.

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Books have much more information than the online tutorials. Although the tutorials at www.gametutorials.com are nice. Just make sure you get the right books(i.e good reviews. Amazon.com has book reviews and lists by other programmers/game developers).

Hey amigo, I am a coderito sitting in your borito(and cuttin'')

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If your asking me, I am in 9th Grade. Next year I can take a programming class, which I will take weather it''s review or not (I always need review anyway), and I am not that confident in my abilitys to learn it on my own. Its not that I am a slow/bad learner, it''s just that I am a quitter and will probably start over on any book I buy a few times unless I can manage to get some serious willpower. I am going to avoid telling my friends that I have any intrest in this just to avoid the negative comments The fact that the books cost me $40 each may motivate me to read them.

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I suggest going over to gametutorials.com. That''s where I learned most of my OpenGL stuff and I see that the C++ tutorials there are in quite abundance. I suggest you download all the tutorials there(which there are about 200+ or so) and try out each one.

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You should certainly get hold of a good reference book for whatever language you decide to use [subliminal message]C++[/subliminal message]

For example, I have Schildt''s "C++: The Complete Reference" (3rd Edition).

You could probably get away with using the Internet to learn an API (OpenGL/DirectX), but still IMO a good book would be better.


pan narrans
Study + Hard Work + Loud Profanity = Good Code

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I (sadly) have 2 or 3 C++ books and I am yet to go beyon the first chapter of any of them. One of them is incredibly small, more an overview of the basics than a learning refrence, and C++ for Dummies got some bad reviews I believe, one from my friend. I don''t think I wanna go buy another book just yet but I will consider it.

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Books, Books and more Books! They are expensive, usually very boreing to read and tend to be 500+ pages long. But all that aside I''ve yet to see any 10 tutorials that can match the information provided in a single ''good'' book.

Checking the book reviews at Amazon and Bookpool are very important when looking for a good book, because there are alot of bad ones and the bad ones are usually a waste of time and money.

The best part about any programming book that tutorials just don''t have... the Index.

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hey, aerolithe!

if you want an AWESOME pair of C++ and OpenGL books:

For c++, i would DEFINATELY AND STRONGLY recommend [C++: The full reference, 3rd. edition]. It is by far the best book on C++. I think it pretty much pays for itself...it''s about $40, and about 1000 pages. it''s for anybody willing to become a master at c++.

for opengl, the one im reading currently is called [OpenGL Game Programming] by PrimaTech. It is really good for beginners, and focuses directly on OpenGL in the Win32 programming envirnment.

You should really check those two books out at your local bookstore. They''re really nice.

Hope this helps!

-sab

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OpenGL game programming is a really good book, and I hear Accelerated C++ is good for people new to C++... but Ive never read it myself (just one of my friends)

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Personally, before I knew anything, tutorials never worked for me because most of the time, the person has downloaded extra libraries and the such.

I used ''Sams Teach Yourself DirectX 7 in 24 Hours'' and that tought me everything (stress, everything) about DirectX with sample programs and everything. Alkl you need is VC6++ and a CD-Rom and your off!
It averages $60 but it''s darn well worth it.

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BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS

BOOKS

books

I can''t stress it enough, books books book! Books are extremely more helpful, and will save you money on asprin.

Tutorials, forums, and chats are great, but not until you have a good foundation of programming knowledge from which you should get from books!

so go out and buy books. look around, you can find them used, cheap, etc. libraries have them, in the computer/tech section. do whatever it takes, but in my opinion if u want to learn programming you need to get books and/or go to college.

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Do not buy "C++: The complete Reference" by Herbert Schildt. It is full of technical mistakes and will teach you highly incorrect C++. Look here for a review by professionals. Actually, all Herbert Schildt books should be avoided like the plague.

"Thinking in C++" by Bruce Eckel is an excellent choice. Or (of course) "The C++ programming language" by Bjarne Stroustrup, though the later one is already pretty complex and not really appropriate for beginners.

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Don''t waste your money buying another C++ book if you are not familiar with the language already. Go to the following site:

http://64.78.49.204/

Download Vol 1 and 2 of Thinking in C++ by Bruce Eckel. This book is exceptional. Not only does he show you correct ways of programming in C++, he gives you 20 to 30 projects to do at the end of each chapter. This book will have you coding with skill in a couple of months. Also, don''t listen to what one reader said about Herber Schildt. He actually has one book which you should pick up. That book is C/C++ Programmers Reference 2nd edition (Don''t buy the complete reference). This book is a cut and dry quick reference to all of the standard C/C++ functions/operators/classes/templates. It doesn''t teach you how to code, it just tells you what everything does. I personally use it to look up different things I need to use, and if I need an example I just type the function name into google. The best thing is that it only costs $19.99. It is a good investment. These two books will give you the knowledge you need to start programming well in the shortest time possible.

The next thing you will want to get it a good windows programming book. Programming Windows by Charles Petzold is probably the best book you can pick up. Though, you can just get away with using the Win32 tutorials you find at the beginning of DirectX books.

If you want to learn OpenGL, then buy the OpenGL Programming Guide, and the OpenGL Programming Reference. Both are good books to have.

If you want to learn DirectX, then you are in trouble. The fact is, most books on DirectX are flawed. The one that I would pick up would probably be Special Effects Game Programming with DirectX 8. The thing that will help you the most would be the documentation and examples that come with the DirectX SDK, but you might have a hard time using some of it unless you have already read a book on DirectX.

As for other books to purchase. I would probably say that after getting familiar with graphics programming using DirectX or OpenGL, you should pick up some of the Game Programming Gems books. You might want to pick up Physics for Game Programming too. Still, you also need to have a firm grasp on C++ programming, so I would say that you should look into more advanced books like Effective C++ and More Effective C++.

That is probably the best advice I can give when purchasing books.

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Thinking in C++ assumses that you know C, something that I do not know. I would like something like that except that assumes I have no programming experience at all, because I don''t. I don''t think buying a book is much of an option right now.

~Aerolithe
(New, improved signature comming soon. Release date in late 2003, but expect delays and cut out features)

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Jesus Christ just buy (or download, which I did AFTER i bought the book, lol) "SAMS Teach yourself C++ in 21 days," or "SAMS Teach yourself C++ in 24 hours" (they are the same.) People keep saying that "Oh this book sucks or this book is good," but the truth is no book is really perfect. Just buy/DL something and quit wasting your time man!

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It may not be perfect but it''d be nice if its something I can understand and something that in general gives correct inforamtion, otherwise its of no use to me. I can get advanced books that are over my head if I want those, I can get information thats completly false by asking my classmates.

~Aerolithe
(New, improved signature comming soon. Release date in late 2003, but expect delays and cut out features)

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