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Buying Visual c++...

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I currently own Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 standard edition but I want the compiler optimisations, remote debugging and I want access to the SSE2 extensions and stuff. I've got no interest in internet programming and I don't want to have to get used to an entirely new interface to MSVC6. I work with MFC and DirectX and I'd like to still be able to shove in assembly code here and there. Any idea what microsoft product I should go for? The Visual Studio .net pro is the closest thing I could find to what I'm looking for, but it seems to have a lot of crap in it which I won't need. Oh yeah, and once I've got something, how easy is it to upgrade when the next version comes out. Cheers. [edited by - philscott on November 9, 2002 7:41:12 AM]

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The only crap that VC++ .NET has in it that you don''t need is maybe the ide. The thing about the ide though I really like it now, there is kind of a learning curve to it but once you do learn it kinda grows on you. With VC++ .NET you can still do all the stuff like you used to with VC++ 6.0 except the mfc class wizard is gone so you have to learn the ide so you can still do the same thing. *note VC++ .NET does have mfc just not the class wizard. All VC++ .NET is, is VC++ 7.0. You can still make native code and shove in assembly if you want the only way you cant is if you use Managed C++ which means programming with .NET. You don''t have to use the .NET platform if you don''t want to. *note VC++ .NET is the only language in VS .NET that allows this the other ones HAVE to use the .NET framework.

As for ease of upgradeing what do you mean? Money? learning curve?

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Any chance you can give me a brief explanation of what the .net platform is?

I never liked the class wizard that much anyway. Can you give us a brief explanation on what the ide is all about as well?

And I was just referring to money with upgrading. I''m a student and 700 quid just for a piece of fu*king software is bad enough without having to fork out another 700 every time I need to upgrade.

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Any chance you can give me a brief explanation of what the .net platform is?

I never liked the class wizard that much anyway. Can you give us a brief explanation on what the ide is all about as well?

And I was just referring to money with upgrading. I''m a student and 700 quid just for a piece of fu*king software is bad enough without having to fork out another 700 every time I need to upgrade.

cheers

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If you are a student you should get the acedemic edition.

I got Visual Studio.NET Acedemic Edition (which is basically VS.NET Pro + some extra student stuff) for about £100. This includes VC++.NET, VB.NET and C#.NET.

I bought it from some company on the net, which I can''t find now, try your uni/college''s computer center, they may be able to sel you a copy, or else they will know where to look.

Alan

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They sell it online at QBS software for £65. I don''t get that at all. Does it definitely have all the professional features. I was specifically after the optimisation options and the remote debugger.

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