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.NET stuff

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What''s up with all this .NET stuff? I''ve been waiting for Vis C++ 7.0 to come out but instead there''s just .NET available. Vis Studio 6.0 seems to no longer be available in stores. Is Vis Studio .NET the same as version 7.0 or is it just for Internet programming? Would I still be able to create Win32 apps that don''t use the Internet with it?

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Visual Studio .NET is Visual Studio 7. The c++ compiler it comes with is Visual C++ v7.0. You can still compile windows/console apps very easily. There is no need to use the .NET functionality, and even if you do, most of it doesn''t use the internet in any case.

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Premandrake is right on the money -- Visual Studio.Net is not just for Internet programming. I''m developing a client-side application using Visual Studio.Net. (I''m using C#, but Visual Studio also supports C/C++. In fact, most of Microsoft now programs almost ALL of its software in C# because it is so much easier to code than C++.)

Sorry, I digress. VS.Net comes with an optimized C++/C compiler and can even write managed C++ (C++ with a garbage collector.)


Alexander "DmGoober" Jhin
alexjh@online.microsoft.com
[Warning! This email account is not attended. All comments are the opinions of an individual employee and are not representative of Microsoft Corporation.]

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quote:
Original post by DmGoober
In fact, most of Microsoft now programs almost ALL of its software in C# because it is so much easier to code than C++.)



Really? Where did you hear that from?




My compiler generates one error message: "does not compile."

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Well I don''t know about ALL of it but I do know about the .NET libaries. They were done in C# and I can attest to the ease of making .NET applications with C# it is alot easyer. Mind you I still use C++ because that is the only way I can make "normal" apps (ones that run without the .NET runtime) as for what .NET is in case you are wondering. It is a restructuring of the win32 api. You can do most of the stuff of the .NET libaries without them but it is alot easyer with them.

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quote:

Original post by alnite
Original post by DmGoober
In fact, most of Microsoft now programs almost ALL of its software in C# because it is so much easier to code than C++.)

Really? Where did you hear that from?



I work at Microsoft. There is a big push towards using .net/CLR for everything possible (of course certain low level stuff is still written in C or other low level language.) .net is faster to program and it is safer. All of the coding that I do uses C#. I really like it, especially for writing Windows Applications. It's all made very easy by Win Forms, which are basically classes for commonly used windows elements. (no more message pump! Yipeee!!!)

Alexander "DmGoober" Jhin
alexjh@online.microsoft.com
[Warning! This email account is not attended. All comments are the opinions of an individual employee and are not representative of Microsoft Corporation.]

[edited by - DmGoober on November 19, 2002 10:33:26 PM]

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I''ve seen a lot of people mix up the .NET terminology.

Visual Studio.NET - the new Microsoft compiler. Doesn''t make you write .NET Framework code, or use the CLR, in C++. You don''t even need it to use the .NET framework. I have seen some unnoficial (and I think illegal) benchmarks of .NET CLR code vs traditional code and it turns out that, in this particular benchmark, managed code it actually faster (compiled using ngen).

.NET Framework - the new API, as someon pointed out earlier.

Gamedev for learning.
libGDN for putting it all together.

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