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Fast Track C++?

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I''m not a C programmer yet. I''m considering it, although I can''t get even the simplest of programs to work right. That''s why I love BASIC in all its forms - it''s simple and easy to get right the first time through. However, C++ is being recommended to me, but like Java, I find that I can''t even begin to learn the language because I can''t get anything to work right. *****What''s the fastest way to get programming in C++, the fastest way to begin making 3D games (simple ones), and the fastest way to begin making network/online multiplayer games? Thanks for any help! DREW 648.ontheweb.com/games drew.ontheweb.com

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:

*****What''s the fastest way to get programming in C++, the fastest way to begin making 3D games (simple ones), and the fastest way to begin making network/online multiplayer games?



One step at a time. Trying to make a 3D game or a networkable game right off the bat will just bog you down in details and make things seem confusing. Take your time and make sure you have a good understanding with the language before you go off and start making complex speeches with it. Programming is fun, but it can be tremendously difficult and nearly painful if you try and get ahead of yourself.

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What''s the fastest way to get programming in C++.

- Elbow grease, "Accelerated C++" (Koenig, Moo).

The fastest way to begin making 3D games (simple ones).

- Humility, trigonometry, linear algebra, OpenGL, a windowing toolkit ( SDL, FLTK, Tk ... )

The fastest way to begin making network/online multiplayer games?

- Regular reality checks, Berkeley Socket API, multithreading

Additionally, a good dose of pragmatism, originality and cash to buy *real* books help.


Documents [ GDNet | MSDN | STL | OpenGL | Formats | RTFM | Asking Smart Questions ]
C++ Stuff [ MinGW | Loki | SDL | Boost. | STLport | FLTK | ACCU Recommended Books ]

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quote:
Original post by Drew648
the fastest way to begin making network/online multiplayer games?


After seeing this question at least 50 times, I figured I''d answer it.

The most important part of an online multiplayer game is the server setup. If you aren''t proficient in highly optimized multithreaded network programming, your game will slow to a crawl and provide a terrible experience for users. Things to think about:

1. Security. By this, I don''t mean cheating; I''m talking about the ability of malicious users to sabotage the game system itself. Make sure your RDBMS is set to reject outside connections; usually, you''ll want it to be on a completely isolated LAN connected to your game servers. Common network security comes into play (buffer overflows, partial-completion DOS attacks, taint checking, etc.). Account systems should be robust and well-tested by a security auditing firm; exposing players'' private details to hackers is a good way to get nailed with a lawsuit. Additionally, many merchant-service providers are now requiring this audit.

2. Scalability. Run regression tests from day one. A good client-test cluster is imperative; 10 machines capable of simulating 20 connections each is a good start, although of course it depends on how many connections you expect to support per server. An effective network is half of this, of course; depending on your exact setup, you''ll want at least a dedicated 100 mbit connection from your game servers to your data/RDBMS servers.

3. Stability. A server with less than 99% uptime will be roundly criticized as unstable. Shoot for 99.99% uptime. A 24/7 NOC staff is essential; coloc personnel know enough to push the reset button, and that''s about it. Offsite backups should be performed daily; your tape silo should have enough capacity to store at least 3 months of full data, and several years of account data (check state/federal laws for exact specs).


Don''t listen to me. I''ve had too much coffee.

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