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Game About Making A Game

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What about a game where you design a game? Let''s say you have a very complex AI character that you have to appease by amusing him, and you amuse him by designing a game for him. You can create game mechanics within the real game''s universe and the AI plays. Your challenge is to learn how to create game mechanics that are fun to your AI character. It''d be tough to come up with solid possibilities for game mechanics. But it''d be quite a neat little game.

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Sort of an interactive tutorial about the game design process? That''d be one heck of a huge game unless you went about it via the one-man-project ideal. But if one went for realism...the game might end up having long periods of tediousness. Imagine having to code everything...

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I think he''s talking more like SimGolf. A game where you have to build something for a specific target audience. A simulation game about video games. I know the idea has been tossed around in here before, might want to check further back.

-Ryan "Run_The_Shadows"
-Run_The_Shadows@excite.com
-The Navidson Record! The best film you''ll never see!

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Oh yeah! I''m dumb. SimGolf is exactly the type of thing I was thinking of.

Bah no search function means I have to manually read every topic.

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Haha screw the search function. Let''s have Diodor be a dedicated thread-finder

There wasn''t all that much to that thread. It was written before SimGolf was made. I wonder what other "games" it could be applied to.

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Transportation Tycoon [Deluxe], seems to fit in this category of games your talking about. There''s a huge following of people that are still actively playing and moding/hacking the game... and I must add that I still have it on my HD; it''s great fun and when I''m burnt on coding or designing I usually end up playing the game for about 3 hours straight. When the game first came out I could be found playing all nighters only to realize this fact when I heard the birds chirping... only a few games have sucked me in like that...


Dave "Dak Lozar" Loeser

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whens chris sawyer gonna release transport tycoon 2 @%!%! if hes even planning on that is... hes too busy wrapped up in rollercoaster tycoon. yep transport tycoon was great, especially over network with my bro (because the computer AI would build the dumbest railroad networks sometimes and destroy the country side)

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oh yeah about the actual thread... :D

isnt what you''re thinking of basically like the sims? except maybe no control over the character.

or theme park. you design the park to suit what the customers demand.

to be honest, these games i mentioned, although they have their novelty value (and I probably have played them quite a bit when they were first around), get boring afterwhile. (with the exception of transport tycoon - i think due to the fact that it takes so long to get to the position of "transport tycoon" and once you''re there, new vehicles are still being released).

transport tycoon didnt lose the gamer as it offered many goals to set (subsidies that had to be fulfilled).

...
basically.. if you can make sense out of this thread, go ahead. i don''t really see where this is leading but seeing as someone mentioned transport tycoon.. i had to say something :D
sorry

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If your virtual devver adopted a software-factory approach, I could see things working out a little better.

Your games get assembled from components (such as ''graphics engine version 1,'' ''networking module version 3'') and so on. You start with no components available, and must research in order to get them.

Of course, time spent researching is time lost developing. When you are presented with a design (from your designer) it gives estimates as to the component levels needed (i.e. ''graphics 3, sound 1, network 2,'' and so on). You have to pick a design which will sell well (given by ''genre,'' ''excitement,'' ''action rating,'' and so on), yet the components required for it would be either already under your belt, or attainable within the deadline set down by the publisher.

Actually, I could see this working...

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates
- sleeps in a ham-mock at www.thebinaryrefinery.cjb.net

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hmmmm...I''m kind of interested in the type of game you guys are talking about, it might be kind of large though.

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Also you can have a choice of publisher - One with bigger penetration but offers less percentage. Or those with a bigger up-front cash layout versus bigger downstream payoffs

ZoomBoy
Developing a iso-tile 2D RPG with skills, weapons, and adventure. See my old Hex-Tile RPG GAME, character editor, diary, 3D Art resources at Check out my web-site

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quote:
Original post by superpig
If your virtual devver adopted a software-factory approach, I could see things working out a little better.

Your games get assembled from components (such as 'graphics engine version 1,' 'networking module version 3') and so on. You start with no components available, and must research in order to get them.

Of course, time spent researching is time lost developing. When you are presented with a design (from your designer) it gives estimates as to the component levels needed (i.e. 'graphics 3, sound 1, network 2,' and so on). You have to pick a design which will sell well (given by 'genre,' 'excitement,' 'action rating,' and so on), yet the components required for it would be either already under your belt, or attainable within the deadline set down by the publisher.

Actually, I could see this working...


Then the game gets sent out for review and gets scores based on how good its parts are, also based on how good the competitors' current games are. So if they're all 1 grade better than yours in every component then they'll get better reviews.

But not only do reviews count, other aspects of marketing will help make sales to make profit for the next game.

Then they'd be publisher pressures and deadlines, and you might have to sacrifice that extra grade up on the graphics component because it's going to take another month to develop and the publisher wants the game NOW. The publisher could also want the deadlines stuck to better nearer to the Christmas period, but be more easy going in the summer. If you consistently fail deadlines then the publisher would want to drop you and you're out to find another publisher.

(Yes, I know the pub would handle the marketing normally, but I think it would be more fun if the player handled it)

Edit:

  • Sticking to deadlines well helps your image among publishers.
  • Perhaps your first game has to go for the Internet shareware publishing route because it is of a lower quality? Or perhaps you can choose to take a fat-ass loan in the beginning because you think you could be more profitable spending more time in development and then getting a retail publisher with this game.


[edited by - garconbifteck on December 10, 2002 5:29:42 PM]

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Here''s what I''m thinking so far...

1) Starting up

You have to hire staff, purchase technology (not just computers, things like engine licenses as well), and find a premises. You need at least 1 designer, 1 programmer, 1 artist - although the same person could do one or more of those jobs (a person has ''programmer'' or ''artist'' skills which can be used), you won''t be able to have someone as one job *and* another at the same time...

2) Ideas

You get your developer to come up with some ideas, while assigning your other people to research jobs (which will improve their skill levels, and make them faster later on - as well as providing you with new components from time to time). Your designer comes up with various ideas, which are summarised with genre, required components, estimated dev time, ''action,'' ''mental,'' and other ratings to give you an idea of what the game is (without needing a large database of game ideas). Of course, something with a high action rating will probably have a low mental rating, and so on - you have to judge from market trends which design you think will be best recieved.

3) Development and funding

Two things happen in this stage. Firstly, you have to control development on the game - assigning developers to tasks, allocating funds to things (like the motion capture studio you want to hire, or the actors for that FMV), dealing with tech problems that occur (one of the machines has broken down and needs to be repaired). Secondly, you have to talk to publishers (assuming you''re still on your first game) and secure an contract. Some publishers won''t take you until you''ve finished a certain % of your game, and others have varying financial terms. If your game is finished and you still don''t have a publisher, then you can put your people back to research, but the money keeps ticking away...

4) Marketing

As your game nears completion, you have to control the marketing of your game (not really your job, as someone noted, but what the hey). You can buy ads in magazines and tv and so on; or, you could send demos off to the game magazines. That''s free, but you risk a bad review if the magazine doesn''t like it...

5) Support

While you start the cycle again for the next game (i.e. GO TO 2), you have to support previous games; otherwise, your next game will suffer predjudice. Employing trained support personnel, dedicating programmers to making patches, and so on.

Well, there''s my potshot at it.

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates
- sleeps in a ham-mock at www.thebinaryrefinery.cjb.net

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I''ll post again tonight with something full, but last night I had lots of ideas : ) It looked a lot like Championship Manager in my head oddly enough... :S (Even though I hate CM)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
*bump*

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