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Visual Studio .NET 2003

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I was just wondering if anyone had heard what kind of pricing Microsoft is going to have for Visual Studio .NET 2003. I know they''ve gotten to the final beta and they were talking about it being very inexpensice for people with a full version Visual Studio .NET Professional and higher. Has that changed? Has Microsoft announced final pricing?

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Not that I know of. They recently said the upgrade to Visual Studio .NET 2003 would cost USD 29 for registered users of the current Visual Studio .NET.

Personally, I''m still annoyed by Microsoft''s decision to drop the professional version of Visual C++. You now have to buy (or upgrade to) the entire Visual Studio package just to get their C++ compiler.

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I don''t know about the price, but VS.NET 1.1 has a new good feature. It gives C++ RAD without MFC I''ve tried it out a bit and it looks very interesting. I might consider upgrading my VS.NET Pro

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Does anyone know if the .NET 2003 upgrade applies to the academic version of VS .NET as well? The academic version I have is exactly the same as .NET professional except that it has some additional instructor and student materials with it, and of course, cost about 1/10 of what the pro version costs.

Phillip

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quote:
Original post by spock
Personally, I''m still annoyed by Microsoft''s decision to drop the professional version of Visual C++. You now have to buy (or upgrade to) the entire Visual Studio package just to get their C++ compiler.


No, you can get the C++ compiler free. It comes with the .NET Framework SDK. You only have to buy the entire thing if you want the optimizing C++ compiler.


I am a Jedi, like my father before me.

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The compiler for free is good, but it''s the IDE that I like about VS.NET The whole all-in-one with dynamic help and a kind-of decent resource editor.

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quote:
Original post by DukeAtreides076
You only have to buy the entire thing if you want the optimizing C++ compiler.


I should have formulated that differently. They still sell the Standard version of Visual C++, but a non-optimizing C++ compiler is little more than a toy.

[edited by - spock on December 7, 2002 8:10:36 PM]

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quote:
Original post by rexizt
I don''t know about the price, but VS.NET 1.1 has a new good feature. It gives C++ RAD without MFC I''ve tried it out a bit and it looks very interesting. I might consider upgrading my VS.NET Pro



Only if you use managed C++ (aka the .NET libraries).

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quote:
Original post by djkno3
Only if you use managed C++ (aka the .NET libraries).



Relying on the .NET Framework/JIT/Runtime is neither better nor worse than relying on MFC''s libraries. You''re bound to the OS just the same.


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Hey I never said it was worse or better (actually I like the .NET libaries). I was just pointing out that the RAD part of VC++ .NET is only avalible if you use .NET.

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quote:
Original post by spock
Personally, I''m still annoyed by Microsoft''s decision to drop the professional version of Visual C++.
I was annoyed with that as well, but with the rebate they offered when the product was released, I was able to upgrade for about what I used to pay for Visual C++ Pro upgrades (it was a little less actually), plus now I''ve got C# to play around with and Visual Basic should I ever decide to go in that direction. If you missed the rebate though, the cost is kind of steep anymore if you''re only using C++.

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I will have to check (which I will not get round to doing until I get a new motherboard... fucking capacitors decided to emit their magic smoke on Friday night) but I believe that the WinXP DDK contains the optimizing C++ compiler. I don''t think it''s downloadable any more, but if memory serves, it''s available for cost of media and shipping.

This may provide a cost-effective way of getting the optimizing C++ compiler.

But, like I say, I don''t know for certain.

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Does anyone know if the .NET 2003 upgrade applies to the academic version of VS .NET as well? The academic version I have is exactly the same as .NET professional except that it has some additional instructor and student materials with it, and of course, cost about 1/10 of what the pro version costs.

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quote:
Original post by Brobanx
Does anyone know if the .NET 2003 upgrade applies to the academic version of VS .NET as well? The academic version I have is exactly the same as .NET professional except that it has some additional instructor and student materials with it, and of course, cost about 1/10 of what the pro version costs.




Heh, I''m interested in that as well, especially considering I''m no longer classified as an "academic user"...

If I had my way, I''d have all of you shot!


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From a post[1] on microsoft.public.dotnet.academic:

Hi William - we haven''t announced pricing or upgrade policies yet for Visual
Studio .NET Academic. Look for info on that sometime early next year.
Thanks! -g


[1]http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=e8U0GzNlCHA.1284%40tkmsftngp02



For those who believe in God, most of the big questions are answered. But for those of us who can''t readily accept the God formula, the big answers don''t remain stone- written. We adjust to new conditions and discoveries. We are pliable. Love need not be a command or faith a dictum. I am my own God. We are here to unlearn the teachings of the church, state, and our educational system. We are here to drink beer. We are here to kill war. We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that Death will tremble to take us -- Charles Bukowski

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Hmm, I''m wondering. Does my UNI actually sell .net Professional? They say it''s visual studio .net professional, but it''s at 1/10th the cost -- so I dunno if its the academic or the professional edition. I only plan to buy vs.net if I can get the 29 USD upgrade, which is only for owners of .net professional.

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