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JimboC

Visual Studio .NET 2003

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I was just wondering if anyone had heard what kind of pricing Microsoft is going to have for Visual Studio .NET 2003. I know they''ve gotten to the final beta and they were talking about it being very inexpensice for people with a full version Visual Studio .NET Professional and higher. Has that changed? Has Microsoft announced final pricing?

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Not that I know of. They recently said the upgrade to Visual Studio .NET 2003 would cost USD 29 for registered users of the current Visual Studio .NET.

Personally, I''m still annoyed by Microsoft''s decision to drop the professional version of Visual C++. You now have to buy (or upgrade to) the entire Visual Studio package just to get their C++ compiler.

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I don''t know about the price, but VS.NET 1.1 has a new good feature. It gives C++ RAD without MFC I''ve tried it out a bit and it looks very interesting. I might consider upgrading my VS.NET Pro

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Does anyone know if the .NET 2003 upgrade applies to the academic version of VS .NET as well? The academic version I have is exactly the same as .NET professional except that it has some additional instructor and student materials with it, and of course, cost about 1/10 of what the pro version costs.

Phillip

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quote:
Original post by spock
Personally, I''m still annoyed by Microsoft''s decision to drop the professional version of Visual C++. You now have to buy (or upgrade to) the entire Visual Studio package just to get their C++ compiler.


No, you can get the C++ compiler free. It comes with the .NET Framework SDK. You only have to buy the entire thing if you want the optimizing C++ compiler.


I am a Jedi, like my father before me.

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The compiler for free is good, but it''s the IDE that I like about VS.NET The whole all-in-one with dynamic help and a kind-of decent resource editor.

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quote:
Original post by DukeAtreides076
You only have to buy the entire thing if you want the optimizing C++ compiler.


I should have formulated that differently. They still sell the Standard version of Visual C++, but a non-optimizing C++ compiler is little more than a toy.

[edited by - spock on December 7, 2002 8:10:36 PM]

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quote:
Original post by rexizt
I don''t know about the price, but VS.NET 1.1 has a new good feature. It gives C++ RAD without MFC I''ve tried it out a bit and it looks very interesting. I might consider upgrading my VS.NET Pro



Only if you use managed C++ (aka the .NET libraries).

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quote:
Original post by djkno3
Only if you use managed C++ (aka the .NET libraries).



Relying on the .NET Framework/JIT/Runtime is neither better nor worse than relying on MFC''s libraries. You''re bound to the OS just the same.


[ Start Here ! | How To Ask Smart Questions | Recommended C++ Books | Free C++ IDE. ]
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