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C++ Datatypes and OS Datatypes :: C++

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Hi. In general, is it more extensible to implement core C++ datatypes in 32bits and 64bits operating system, or should you implement the OS specific datatypes? For example, under Windows you can implement a DWORD (32bits unsigned integer). A DWORD is equal to C++ unsigned long. I would like to know what is most extensible in terms of C++ design and implementation? Lastly, what is the point of an int datatype in 32bits and 64bits OS? In 32bits OS, an int is equal to a long. Thanks, Kuphryn

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C99 defines exact-size integers in <stdint.h>, letting you specify int16_t, uint8_t ... or uint64_t ... and be sure to get the right size.

The boost library provides that service for C++ in their own <boost/cstdint.hpp>.

int is essentially a legacy from C.


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