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Raymondo

Rpg skills

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I am trying integrate rpg elements into a fps, but I am having a difficult time coming up with skills that would work well in an FPS. So the skills I have are: Firearms, Demolitions, Stealth, Piloting, Engineering, Mining, Medicine, Animal Handling,and Mechanics. In my opinion, I think there should be *at least*, 3 or 4 more skills... Does anyone have any ideas?

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Deus Ex incorporated RPG ideas pretty well - to the point where I''m tempted to call it an RPG with first person 3D interface rather than an FPS.

If you haven''t played it yourself, you can find pretty good information on it at places like gamefaqs.com

FYI, these are the Deus Ex skills:

Computer, Electronics, Environmental Training, Lockpicking, Medicine, Swimming, Weapons Demolition, Weapons Low-Tech, Weapons Heavy, Weapons Pistol, Weapons Rifle

Electronics duplicated lockpicking but for electronic locks. Otherwise, they''re all pretty much what they sound like.

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Below is a list of skills shamelessly ripped from Fallout, I quit eliked the way fallout skills worked, so perhaps this could help the ideas start to flow for you at least.....

Small Guns:
The skill that determines how well use of pistols, rifles, shotguns and other small firearms you are. Based on Agility.als faster.

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Big Guns:
The skill that determines how well use of bigger guns, like rocket launchers and miniguns you are. Based on Agility.


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Energy Weapons:
The skill that determines how well use of lasers, plasma and other high-tech weapons you are. Based on Agility.


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Unarmed:
The skill that determines how well using your fists and feet in hand-to-hand combat you are. Based on Strength and Agility.


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Melee Weapons:
The skill that determines how well use of knives, spears and other melee weapons you are. Based on Strength and Agility.


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Throwing:
How well you can aim a thrown object, like a grenade. Based on Agility.


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First Aid:
The healing of minor wounds, this skill will not work on someone who is bandaged. A First Aid kit is required for use. Based on Perception and Intelligent.


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Doctor:
He healing of major wounds and crippled limbs. A Doctor''s Bag is required for use. Doctor can be used to wake an unconscious person. Based on Perception and Intelligent.


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Sneak:
The art of moving silently, this skill is very useful if you do not want to alert your enemies of your presents. Based on Agility.


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Lockpick:
The skill of opening locked doors and items. Based on Perception and Agility.


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Steal:
The art of acquiring what is not yours. Can be used to steal an item from a person, or to give them an item without them knowing about it. Works best if you are stealing small items from behind while sneaking. Based on Agility.


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Traps:
The skill of spotting, disarming and setting traps and explosives. Based on Perception and Agility.


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Science:
Knowledge of all things scientific, like chemistry and computers. Based on Intelligent.


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Repair:
The practical application of the Science skill, used to fix broken things. With a Repair Kit, it can be used to repair vehicle damage. Based on intelligent.


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Piloting:
The operation of Vehicles, a higher piloting skill will improve the speed of a vehicle in combat. Based on Perception and Agility.


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Speech:
How well you can talk to other people. A high speech skill can improve you chances of talking people into doing what you want them to do. Based on Charisma.


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Barter:
The skill of trading items, a good Barter skill will improve the value of your items, letting you get more for your money. Based on Charisma.


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Gambling:
How well you can gamble using skill of dice, cards and other gambling games. Based on Luck.


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Outdoorsman:
The skill that determine how well can you survive in the wasteland with the use of knowledge of plants, animals and outdoors living in wide-open areas. This skill sometimes also allows you to avoid unexpected encounters. Based on Intelligent and Endurance.




Other than the skills already suggested, it might be worth your while to use google and do searches on various existant RPG''s and computer RPG''s to learn of the skillsets they use. If I remember rightly Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay had a good skill set if you need anything else to help you get started.

Hope that helps some,

Steve AKA Mephs

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quote:

Big Guns:
The skill that determines how well use of bigger guns, like rocket launchers and miniguns you are. Based on Agility.



That''s interesting. Most systems I''ve seen that link skills to attributes put Heavy Weapons under Strength. The rationalisation is that you need to be pretty strong just to carry the things, never mind point them at something. OK, machine guns may be light enough to carry easily, but then you''ve still got a major recoil to control...

Oh well, whatever works

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quote:
Original post by rmsgrey
That''s interesting. Most systems I''ve seen that link skills to attributes put Heavy Weapons under Strength. The rationalisation is that you need to be pretty strong just to carry the things, never mind point them at something. OK, machine guns may be light enough to carry easily, but then you''ve still got a major recoil to control...
Oh well, whatever works



Yeah, it''s a bit odd that the skill isn''t at least partially based on strength. But all weapons have a minimum strength requirement, and that requirement can be pretty high for big guns.

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I think you´re going about this the wrong way.. first of all you should always try to minimise the number of skills (because redundant skills are annoying). Then you should get your skills from the game, not vice versa. Look at the game environment, at the puzzles and tasks that will be posed, and try to find meaningful skills that can be used with your puzzles.

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quote:

Then you should get your skills from the game, not vice versa.



Actually, I think either approach would work - you can either design your environment, then try and match the game mechanics to the setting, or you can create your game mechanics first and create your setting around them. For example, if you have rules for modern firearms, that suggests an in-game technology level near present-day. If you have rules for picking locks, then locked doors should be an element in your setting. Looking at the original post in this thread, the skills there suggest an industrialised society (engineering, mining and mechanics skills) but with animals in use (animal handling) - probably guard/attack dogs or horses for transportation. The inclusion of Stealth as a skill suggests the possibility of non-lethal approaches. With the list given there, I wouldn''t be surprised to find a game with a central character who''s in a modern military black-ops force.

Also, a skill like stealth is applicable to a lot of situations, so it could provide alternate solutions to various in game puzzles/tasks allowing the player to do unanticipated things that your orginal setting can''t cope with, whereas designing the setting with stealth in mind, you''re much less likely to overlook it.

For more on a closely related topic, see my new thread: "simulation and narration - approaches to design"

I agree that the number of skills required to complete the game should be kept down, and that, if the player is going to have to track the various skills, then the overall number should also be kept down. On the other hand, if the skills are going to be kept hidden from the player then the only constraint on number is how many the game can support. Still, KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) is generally a good motto.

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I don't think there is such a thing as a correct order to make these decisions. You have to realise that you won't know which skills you need before you have fleshed out ideas about the environment, and you won't know what the environment should consist of before you have an early list of the skills.

It's important to have stealth in mind when creating levels and puzzles, but it's also important to have level and puzzle design in mind when deciding how the stealth skill should work.

[edited by - EasyRaider on December 8, 2002 12:06:35 PM]

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In general, until the game ships, nothing should be set in stone. On the other hand, if you''re going for a structured development cycle with separate design and code steps, radical changes of design during the coding stage is not a good sign In any case, neither your mechanics nor your setting should be regarded as fixed until you finalise your design, and even then you should be reluctant to change your design rather than refuse to.

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