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Rah

Truespace 4 anti-aliasing

5 posts in this topic

Hi again I''m in the process of rendering some artwork for use in my game. Now... what is the best way to prevent the antialiasing Truespace performs on the edges of the image? I''ve tried setting the AntiAlias setting to none, but there is still a visible blend of the colours around the edge which looks quite nasty in a game situation. I''ve tried modifying the images manually (in psp) using the ''feather'' and ''contract'' tools to delete the outer row of pixels on the object. This has the effect of removing the ''noise'' but does look a bit odd in that some detail is usually removed as well. How do people deal with this generally? Is it worth the extra cycles to perform a realtime antialiasing blit in-game with the surrounding images? Seems a rather costly solution. Any ideas? Thanks, Russ
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Just turn off the antialiasing.
To do:
right click on render button -> make sure that antialiasing is set to none.

that turns is off.

--------------------------
You also might want to render your stuff (objects) with a set background color. Then just "alpha channel" it in you application.
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If you have antialiasing turned off, then there should be no blending at the edges, but there will be some inside the objects. If you ARE getting some blending (I can''t imagine how) set the renderer to Scanline rather than raycast. The render won''t be as "smooth," but should be okay in the context of usign the rendered image as a sprite (what kind of game are you making?)

-Nick Robalik
http://www.digital-soapbox.com
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Nick,

Yes, thanks, changing the render mode to Scanline did the trick. I''m making a little racing game (with little cars ) and so I have to shrink them right down anyway so the loss of quality is not a problem.

Regarding rendering the images... I''m currently creating a car object, so I can render it at certain degress of rotation. Currently I''m rotating the object, say 18 degrees, each frame manually. However this tends to move the object in a circle, and I''d really prefer it to rotate around it''s center point so I have to move it a little each frame. Is there a better way to do this? Perhaps with a camera or something.

(As you can tell I''m not exactly experience with TS4 )

Anyway, thanks for the tips all,

--
Russ
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If it rotates in a circle change the objects axis.

to do:
goto the axis icon ->either click on the axis and move it or click on the icon that reads "move axis to center of object"

Now when you rotate it does so correctly.
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Yep, I''d recommend the method above, rather than trying to move the camera. Just center the axis, then normalize the rotation. Next, normalize the location. From this point, rotate the object however much you need to, then render out each frame.

As a side note, if you''re interested in doing some fancy camera work, there''s a free plugin floating around somewhere that generates a number of cameras at specific angles - this would be good for doing a Diablo-style game where you need the object from different angles and for some reason can''t rotate it (if you''re using the LifeForms plugin to import mocap data, for example.)

-Nick Robalik
http://www.digital-soapbox.com
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