Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Hans

Is pi truely random?

This topic is 6914 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Maybe I should put this question to some math forum but I don''t know any... Is pi truely random so that if you read an infinite number (in binary format) of decimals in pi, there will be exactly 50-50 amount of 0 and 1? Or can you find n decimals (etc. 10000 decimals) of sqruare_root(2) _inside_ pi? (3.141593, 1.41 comes up quite fast ) Can you find ... everything inside pi? For example, you have a jpeg image and you can find the same jpeg image inside pi if you begin to read from 10^10000th decimal of pi? (no I''m not trying to suggest this as some ridiculous packing algo )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
hard to say because it is an infinitely repeting non-deterministic value (you have to calculate n places before calculating the n+1 place). if you mean is it purely random then no because it is easily determined to be based on an eqaution. If you mean as you posted above a 50-50 bit ratio it is uncertan because there is nothing that says you can not calculate out to the nth place and descover that it goes something like 333... or 353535....
In other words THERE IS NO ANSWER!!!!

3.14159726535897984 (that''s all I could remember) :^)

I have always been lost!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Opps! I forgot to include an equation for calculating pi so that you can use it if you want to!!

here is my personal fave.

pi = 1/3 + 1/5 + 1/7 + 1/9 + .....

so on and so to whatever number of digits you require

I have always been lost!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''m going to correct two of you here. Some digits of pi are 3.141592653589793238. Anyway, the series that you gave was an arithmatic series, so the series will diverge. If you added up all the numbers, you''d get infinity. I think the series actually goes like this:

pi = 4/1 - 4/3 + 4/5 - 4/7 + 4/9 - ...


ColdfireV

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
u know sometimes u can find patterns in pi, that makes it easier to memorize
pi=3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510
and no, i didn't memorize that, i only have it memorized to the first 18 digits after decimal

- oops, some numbers were wrong the first time i posted this i had to edit it

- pouya


Edited by - pouya on 4/30/00 2:26:23 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PI to 2000 places, that is wimpy. Here is PI to 100,000 places.


http://cad.ucla.edu/repository/useful/PI.txt or
http://www.uoguelph.ca/zoology/devobio/210labs/MeiosisQuiz/pi.html

or if you really into PI here are 200 million digits of PI in 20 5mb files (compressed):

ftp://www.cc.u-tokyo.ac.jp/.1/pi200m-compressed/


Edited by - Ranok on 4/30/00 2:55:55 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you ever wonder if there was something fundamentally wrong with mathematics that allow numbers such as pi to exist? If the foundation on which everything is built is wrong from the start. For instance, convert 1/3 to decimal, multiply by 3. You''ll never get 1.0, always 0.99999999999. Something is wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Point 9 repeating is one( ie. 0.99999999 == 1 for you coders). You''ll learn the matmatical definition of this when you study series in calculus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!