• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

skrwX

How do I make sprites like the ones in Megaman X, Megaman 9, etc.?

6 posts in this topic

I want to make a 2d game as a start in game programming. For this game I need sprites and I thought: "Why not making them myself!" The Problem is: I don''t know how to do such high detailed sprites like those in the Megaman-games for the SNES! I know how to make them with a 3D Programm but I want this natural look for the sprites!(My main problem is that I can''t draw the same guy/thing in two different actions without having the guy/thing not looking like its counterpart...) Can anyone give me some hints on creating this kind of sprites?(Are they drawn on paper first?) skrwX
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They are pixeled (that is, drawn pixel by pixel)
The artist starts out with blobs of color, then refines the blobs of color until it has the basic shape he wants.. then he keeps refining them.. adding more details.. and anti-aliasing (by hand!) until it has the desired look

then to create more frames of the animation, the artist would take the picture from the last frame, and only change the parts that need changing (ie.. move one leg forward a little or whatever)

it takes a lot of talent.. i''ve watched it being done.. but I can''t do it myself :/
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmm what do mean by "natural look for the sprites" Do you mean you want them to look cartoonish? If that''s the case most 3D packages can produce that type of look. Just animate the character the way you want him/her/it to be and render with some type of flat shading. You could always take the individual images and process them by hand after rendering. Just my 0.0000002 cents worth. I hope that helps a bit.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When doing little character animations for shoot ´em ups it´s much easier doing your characters by hand because (if you look at Megaman for instance) you don´t need a lot of frames. Especially the old SNES games never had more than 6 frames for a running character. If you want it to look smooth and nice I would suggest you use about twelve frames. (You could use one of the animations that comes with the Animation shop as a starting point)
Just scale ´em down and draw over them. It works ok and you can get results fast.
As for the other stuff (shooting, jumping ... ) you have to do that by hand but these aren´t many frames, so I guess you should be set within a day or two. Just don`t lose patience.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://cosmigo.com/promotion/

Fantastically good utility for drawing classic ''16 bit'' sprites, (that I use for commercial work), unfortunately it has a few rather essential disabled features, tho'' it only costs $60 and it''s the best package I''ve come across.

It also has a lightbox feature, which though it wont compensate for your commented lack of drawing skills, it certainly will make things easier.

Rest begards,
On Off

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DeluxeAnimate - the animation version of DeluxePaint was the tool of choice for over five years.

There are times when I miss that old warhorse.

$0.02
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites