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cossin

Windows linux

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What I think about this topics is that in the operating system business isn''t always the quality who count but the mass who win ... what I mean is MS have already 90% of the computer in the world with Windows on it .... for Normal user (lawyer, accountant etc..) & (normal business) they won''t change to linux and re-learn the whole of the OS ... (+ formation of the employee) even if linux is more stable & better .... that will take a while to integrate the mass market, and MS can use this period of time to improve windows ... also , I don''t really like the idea of a open-source operating system as the core of the entire business .... What you guys think ? let''s talk about it ... Cossin

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quote:

also , I don''t really like the idea of a open-source operating system as the core of the entire business ....



why?

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wow, open source OS, that would be excellent. What I mean is, it would be excellent if Windows was opensource. Who cares if Linux is opensource, it''s too flimsy with no h/w support.

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Open-source OS's have an inherit problem. There is no gaurentee that any two of the OS's will be the same, or even act the same. What one person or company changes in the OS can cause other applications to not work properly.

For instance, just a few days ago there was a news article about a rather large security flaw in the Redhat Linux release. Obviously this happens with ALL OS's (ie Microsoft ) but in THIS case the problem only cropped up in Redhats version because THEY modified the OS. Had they left it alone it never would have happened. When Linux becomes more popular (and I'm certain it will) this problem will crop up more and more.

Tech support is also a problem. How can a company diagnose what is wrong with an OS if it has been modified (whether the person themselves modified it, or installed code to support hardware which isn't present in the kernel) outside the company? And I may be wrong here, but isn't Redhat's tech support very limited somehow? The fact is, all distributors would need to have a major tech support team (and they may already, like I said I'm not positive on this one).

What happens when new hardware comes out that the OS doesn't support? Either wait 2+ years for support to be placed in the kernel, ala USB, or use code someone else wrote that may or may not work, and may introduce other bugs into the OS.

Obviously there are a LOT of advantages to open-source OS's as well, but there are of course disadvantages as well.

Edited by - Houdini on 5/1/00 4:02:59 PM

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businesses are in business to make money, so a free, open-source solution will not make the most money for a business.
offering your products for free isn''t a good way to make money.. especially when they cost millions of dollars to create.

the consumer would ideally want to get everything for free, of course



adamm@san.rr.com

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I mostly agree with your first point. Getting the masses to adopt Linux on the desktop seems highly unlikely in the near future. I can think of a couple of problems hindering Linux as a desktop OS for both the home and corporate environment:

- Linux is still too difficult for the average end-user (don’t believe me? Try installing a new font on a typical Linux distribution, then do the same for a Windows 98 install)

- Then there is the whole Microsoft Office problem…

- Lack of high-productivity development tools. Internally developed software is a large and important investment for many companies.

- Most corporate applications are not developed in C++ or Perl, and other languages seem to be an after-thought to the Linux community.

As to your second point I highly disagree. One of the reasons we are adopting Linux on our file and Web servers is specifically because it is Open Source. We believe that security by obscurity is a flawed concept, and that Open Source efforts tend to produce better quality software (because there is no financial incentive to ship crap to make quick profits). There is the problem with development tools mentioned above, but Java is helping that out quite a bit on the server side.

With the DMCA on the books and UCITA around the corner, I believe many businesses are going to see an additional compelling argument for Open Source. These laws put consumers of software at a severe legal disadvantage versus the software producers - so the question may become can you afford to trust your business to a proprietary OS.

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