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Antony52

Dual CPU And Game Support.

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I have a dual PIII 1,26GHz PC.If we lets say add their speeds then we are talking about a 2,53GHz machine.However how many games if any support dual cpu.I have been told that the games are using a 15% from the second cpu only.When are we going to see dual cpu support?What programming technics are necessary for making a game support 2 cpu''s and more?

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Remember that, in general, the OS gets to decide which processes use which CPUs, not the programs.

To use more than one CPU effectively you really need a threaded programming model. Games don''t really do much concurrent processing, although most could benefit a little from doing more than they actually do. The problem is that the gains for games are quite small - very small on single-processor systems, which comprise the overwhelming majority - compared to the problems of synchronising data between threads.

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You can...

A)switch to Unix/Linux and use one of the dual chip kernels

B)siwtch to Apple Computers. This is what I did.

C)Beg MS to make software that doesn''t suck (like that''ll ever happen)

Windows is just not a good OS system. It has no support for featurs like true multithreading, and tends to crash 2x a day (even Windows XP/2000).

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quote:
Original post by Evangelion
...stuff...


Do you have any idea what you are talking about, or are you just trolling? Would you care to explain how switching to Linux will make a single-threaded game run faster on a dual CPU machine? Could you please explain exactly what is wrong with NT''s multiprocessor/multithreading support?

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AFAIK, if the game uses multithreading, then the OS can put a thread onto each CPU, and use both CPUs as effectively as possible.

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quote:
Original post by Evangelion
You can...

A)switch to Unix/Linux and use one of the dual chip kernels

B)siwtch to Apple Computers. This is what I did.

C)Beg MS to make software that doesn't suck (like that'll ever happen)

Windows is just not a good OS system. It has no support for featurs like true multithreading, and tends to crash 2x a day (even Windows XP/2000).


Please inform you before posting such bullshit
First of all Windows NT (thus 2000 and XP) HAS multiprocessor support and multithreading.
9x HAS multithreading (I can't remind that I was forced to close a program before I use another in 9x), but no multiprocessor support (but you aren't forced to use that OS, which is crappy IMHO)
Even the multithreading of 9x is preemptiv ("true" in your words)
Mac OS 9 used non-preemptiv mutlithreading ("not true"), and I think 9x is older.
My Windows XP installation crashed last time a month ago, which was a driver problem not a fault of MS.
I usualy start my machine once a day without a reboot if I'm not forced to do so.
And there is VERY good software produced by MS, especially Office, IE and Visual Studio (there is no IDE for Linux which is as good as VS)


[edited by - noVum on December 24, 2002 4:29:45 PM]

[edited by - noVum on December 24, 2002 4:35:21 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Mathematix
One of your CPUs is enough to run all of today''s games smoothly. Why do you need dual CPU support?


More efficient use of available computing power should always be a goal. What you''re saying is a bit like "well, our processors of today can run all todays game, why do we need to build faster processors?" We''re not around to build today''s games, we''re around to build tomorrow''s games.

If you can use the computers'' processors efficiently you could increase framerate or add more features, which is basicly what all game programming has as it''s goal anyway when you come some way into a project. Doing this in a scalable way is a huge challenge, but a worthy one.

An interesting problem posed by this is that Windows OSes for instance have quite bad emulation of multiprocessing (i.e. timeslicing between threads), and if you only have one processor you''d probably want to run singlethreaded or with only a few threads.

By the way, is there any way to find out how many processors different systems run on?

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