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minipadawan

Oooohhhhh the pain......

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I just don''t know what to do! When I first looked into game development, programming was the first thing that stood out. I tried my hand at C++ but I am doing miserably. The second thing that stood out was the 3D Modeling/Animation, so I tried my hand at that. I have been using 3D Studio Max for about 1 1/2 weeks and all I can do is model a hotdog! I just don''t think gamedev is for me but whenever I think about doing somehting non-gamedev related, I sorta.....get pulled back into gamedev where I sit and attempt to sort it out and find something that suits me. I know what your thinking right now. "Oh, this guy wants me to feel sorry for him!" That''s not true. I''m just posting here to see if anyone can help me figure out what suits me? What I can stick with and continue doing. I really want to work with game development but I need to find a "job" that better fits me (i.e. Programmer, Modeler, Designer, etc.). Thanks for any help you may give. minipadawan

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When I felt a sense of purpose in life I felt convinced it had something to do with the game industry or special effects in sci-fi movies or TV shows or telling stories or something like that.

Then I let myself get in too deep into thinking I would be a game developer and SPLAT. Got burned out, lost my drive, with no replacement.

There's a reason you're interested in it. See what there is about it that interests you so much. What are your talents and interests, and how to they apply to game development? What aspects do you think about most when you feel drawn back into it, and what is it about it that appeals to you in those moments? What do you imagine about it and think to yourself, "Wow, now it would be cool to do that or be involved in that?"

[edited by - Waverider on December 26, 2002 6:36:53 PM]

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Keep at learning programming. If you haven''t already, buy yourself a GOOD book (check the "books & software" section of GameDev for help finding one) and spend a lot of time on it.

If you decide to go the artist route, take some time to cultivate your artistic skills in a medium other than 3D graphics. While it isn''t absolutely necessary, being able to doodle realistically is great preparation for executing a design in 3D.


Don''t listen to me. I''ve had too much coffee.

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I really want to be a programmer because I know a programmer who works at Midway (yes, I got to tour their Milpitas, CA offices!!). I remember a quote he told me, "Programming is complicated when you see it, but if you learn to understand it, it's like writing an essay in english." That quote is what allways draws me back to the programming side of gamedev.

For those of you who want to know what the tour was like, I can only say one word: A-W-E-S-O-M-E!!!!

Also, if you were wondring how I got the tour, my mom used to work with another secretary who's son-in-law worked at midway (he was the programmer).

Well, I got a $20 gift card for a local bookshop and I'm recieveing another $50 card for the same book shop tomorrow so I guess I will go shopping for a GOOD programming book!


Thanks guys!


minipadawan

[edited by - minipadawan on December 26, 2002 6:58:28 PM]

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There is definitely a composition aspect to programming. Seeing it all come together piece by piece and then function together like a perfectly conducted orchestra. Or maybe more like a newpaper truck in a complicated route, or a couple of them if your program is multi-threaded.

But then there comes that point when you feel like you''ve learned enough to do anything you like, and that voice asks, "Ok, so what do I REALLY want to do with this now?" Listen to that voice. Don''t let the cheese get old on you. ("Who Moved My Cheese?" - a book about change. Good book.)

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The kind of skills nessesary for game development (programing, modeling, etc..) all take months, if not years to learn to do well.

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Amigo,
Most of the big timers in the game industry have been in the industry for 10 or more years... yeah, alot burn out and drop out. But most of the heavy duty players have been around a few years before they make it to senior positions in development or art.

Game programming is not like it was when I was a kid... it''s a complicated business, alot of stuff goes into most modern game development. It takes a few years of practice and dedication to get to the point you can do these things. You have to build up your knowledge in alot of mundane things that seem useless in the beginning.. but all that information is necessary to pull off impressive, complex things. When you learned math, did you start in Differential Equations? When you learned English, did you start with Shaekspeare? Unless you are a prodigy most likely not...

You are probably trying to bite off more than you can chew. You are thinking you can do Quake 3, or some other title that you like, and when you find it hard to just program, you think you suck. Hey, I''ve been programming for 10 years, and I still learn something new everyday.

If you do get in the industry, you will most likely get a junior position, programming or artwork. Boring mundane stuff. That is the apprenticeship, you need to master the fundamental skills of your craft before you can do things that will impress people. I know only a few people who have remarkable talent and just get it right away. Most of us have to work hard at it.

Whatever you decide to do, realize that you are most likely like everyone else, you have to learn the ins and outs of your trade. The only way is to do it, practice, and study. If you can learn everything about game programming in 9 days, you are the smartest human being alive. Not even John Carmack knows everything... he is just good at figuring stuff out much faster than everyone else

Start out with modest goals.. hey, I can''t even model a hotdog in 3ds max, so you are ahead of me... maybe you don''t know what you like yet, so try everything, realizing you are not mastering any of it (so don''t expect much from yourself at this point)... when you''ve tried everything, than you can decide what thing you really like the most, and pursue it. Maybe you are multi-talented, and can do two things good. I can''t, I can only do one thing well, and the rest I only know a little bit about. Whatever. Try everything, give it a shot, than decide which thing you like the most, and concentrate on that.

Even great artists had to study under a master. Great musicians studied under someone (except Mozart really, he was a prodigy.. not many people like him are born).... great programmers studied under someone. For 99.999% of people they need to study a few years before they become recognized by others. Obviously the more talent you have the faster it''ll be for you.








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Wake up dude!!! Like DaMangz said you''re not going to be the best in a week. Heck you said you used studio max for 1.5 weeks and all you could do is model a hotdog. It took me 2 weeks just to work out the frigging controls!!!! It''s taken me a couple of years for me to believe I''m any good at programming. Find what you love. If it''s art then do art, but remember it''s going to take a few months just to get into it and learn the basics then a couple of years learning and then the rest of your life honing your skills. I love programming so thats what I do. Just choose what you love and give yourself a chance. But just remember whatever you do give yourself a chance. It normally takes a few months to learn the basics, a couple of years to learn everything and the rest of your life honing your skills, I know I repeated but I''m trying to make it sink in. Anyway you get the idea.

Adrian




OMG. It''s him again. Call the SHRINK!!!
rambo_bones@hotmail.com
WebSite: http://www.illicitdev.net/~rambobones
GlRott Page: http://www.glrott.tk

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C++ is not very hard. If you got a bunch of books and it''s all still confusing then you were like me. After some frustration I said screw it and taught myself.

I had looked at books and tutorials and it all did not make much sense to me. I really did not have much of an idea of what I was doing. So I figured out my own way to teach myself. I downloaded source code to programs and looked them over and saw how they were set up. If I did not understand something, I''d look it up in one of the books or a tutorial. Eventually everything starts falling into place. I was able to go from looking at programs and saying, "what the hell is this?" to saying, "Oh I see what they are doing there". I only started a couple weeks ago and I still don''t know a lot of stuff. However, I am able to make simple programs and understand a lot of things. I learned way more from teaching myself then having some tutorial or some author tell me what I should be learning first.

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