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Julio

negamax question

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howdy all, I''m thinking of implimenting a checkers game with the computer making it''s moves based on the negamax variation of the min-max algorithm. I have a decent idea of how everything would work, but my question is this: are consumer pc''s powerful enough and with enough memory to build the entire tree? consider the minimum pc would be an 800 mghz w/256 MB of ram. would this be plausible? thanks for any insight. Joe My Homepage Freeservers.com sucks. Angelfire.lycos.com is cool.

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No, you can''t come even close to building the entire tree. And since most of the time none of the nodes you can search are clear victories, you''ll have to create a score for how good a position is, so if the program cannot find a victory by looking ahead, at least it tries to improve his score on the table.

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Currently it would not be possible to store checkers (or most games) from start to end.

You wouldnt have enough RAM + HD space, and the processor wouldn''t be fast enough to handle the calculations within your life time.

Still, there''s nothing wrong with looking ahead 4-8 moves and taking the best one.

good luck,
Will

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You may want to take a look at Chinook: http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/~chinook/ (which was at one time the best checkers playing program available. current desktop programs claim to be better now, which is very possible) This URL: http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/~chinook/databases/total.php shows the total number of positions - 500,995,484,682,338,672,639 - I doubt you could make a tree that big with 800 MHz with 256 MB of RAM.

I programmed a checkers playing program a while ago in DOS (not sure if it works on today''s machines) that you may want to check out: http://www.jasondoucette.com/ai.html, but there''s no source code, and I didn''t use hash tables making its play rather poor. It was programmed very quickly for a simple univeristy course, which did not even require something this complicated. I wish I had time to make it properly... maybe someday.

Jason Doucette
www.jasondoucette.com

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