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Splinter Cell

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I just check out the PC demo to this game and all I have to say is wow! The lighting and shadowing look great. Anyone know what the game uses for casting shadows? It doesn''t appear to be shadow volumes because of the soft edge. I''m guessing the game uses some sort of per pixel lighting as well.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
They use a heavily modified Unreal engine. That probably means they use projected textures for shadows (as seen in UT2K3) along with what they call "a filtering system", most likely for more complex shadows like the ones created by venetian blinds and grates.

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If anyone here''s seen Serious Sam, and payed careful attention to the real-time lighting, y''all should know that real-time shadowcasting is not that hard, and can be done easily even on low-end 400 MHz CPUs. I''m pretty sure that Splinter Cell could do the same thing.

In the demo, what I found somewhat impressive was the infrared vision mode. Now _that_ is some interesting texture work, combined with either a kickass pixel shader or a half-software renderer.

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Serious Sam is a nice engine.

I didn''t like Splinter Cell at all. It might be fun with a console controller, but not with mouse an keyboard like every other fps/tps I''ve played is. And it has some `obvious` logic `bugs` - when pressed back against a wall, you can only see left, right, and behind the character, when you should be able to see left, right, and in front of the character since that is the way he is facing. Very nice gfx tho.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
My guess would be it does everything like the Unreal engine except the real-time dynamic shadows. So yes, lightmapping instead of per-pixel lighting. I''m also guessing that many of the effects like shiny metals and such are handled by Unreal''s cubemap materials, not pixel shaders. These are all guesses based on the fact that a lot of what is in Splinter Cell can currently be done in UT2K3''s engine. But I''ve read that Splinter Cell does in fact use pixel shaders for something, just not sure what it is.

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quote:

what I found somewhat impressive was the infrared vision mode



Agree totally, I was very impressed by how well that works. The shadows are ok, but a bit too overpowering I thought (yeah, yeah I know that is the point of the game but well... ). I thought the controls are brilliant and work really well (although I agree with the wall hugging).

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