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EnigmaZ

Is age a problem?

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i''ve been reading up on game development and programming in genral, and ive been finding that there''s alot of people out there who are in there late teens and already know various programming languages and lots of other information. i was just wondering if it gets any harder for you to learn a programming language\gaming concepts as you get older. (i am 18 and have a VERY basic knowledge of VB6)

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well im 17 and i have just started to learn c++
as im 17 i guess i no quite alot about computers so i guess that helps alot but i still find it hard but i belive when i no c++ everything else will be a breeeze

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Guest Anonymous Poster
From personal experience no (in consideration of myself and my old biker mate chums). I do notice a difference in the enthusiasm for learning something new though.

Al

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quote:
Original post by EnigmaZ
i was just wondering if it gets any harder for you to learn a programming language\gaming concepts as you get older.


No it doesn't get any harder to learn, but it can be a lot harder to find the free time you need in order to learn

I started late myself, and have only been programming for two years. I wish I'd started earlier but I don't think my age has posed a problem to learning.


pan narrans | My Website | Study + Hard Work + Loud Profanity = Good Code

[edited by - pan narrans on January 20, 2003 8:57:09 AM]

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I wouldn't say it's easier , but generally the younger you are, the more effective your brain will be at absorbing what you learn. I am 14. My brain is a spunge.

You shouldn't have any problems at all being 18. It is a perfectly good time to learn.

:::: Lektrix ::::
[ Google || ACCU || BarrysWorld || E-Mail Me ]

[edited by - Lektrix on January 20, 2003 11:36:22 AM]

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quote:

I wouldn''t say it''s easier , but generally the younger you are, the more effective your brain will be at absorbing what you learn. I am 14. My brain is a spunge.



I would highly disagree with that, I''m 22 (not old I know), but I learn *much* better now than I ever have, my learning is far more structured and I have a large base of experience learning in many different fields to draw on.

quote:

but it can be a lot harder to find the free time you need in order to learn



That''s the key. Once you leave school/college/uni unless you go into a programming field you will find it very difficult to juggle a job and learning. That goes for anything, not just programming. (ie learn as much as you possibly can while in school )

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Anyone think about how early you can start? I started at age 10 but learned nothing about hard core programming until I was around age 12... (I am 16 now...)

trying to post for the umteenth time!...

<- Digital Explosions ->
"Discipline is my sword, faith is my shield
do not dive into uncertainty, and you may live to reap the rewards" - (Unreal Championship)

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I started at 13 and I learned QBasic, C++ (Limited to DOS programming knowledge, I may take up win32 soon.), Java, VB 5(eeks... I don't like it), VB .NET(much better) and I am thinking about taking up C# soon too... hmm.... and I am picking up DX 9 both managed and unmanaged(hopefully). I am currently 18 working on a CS Degree. I graduated a lil early... 17. I also am studying to get CCNA certification and A+ certification. So you are fine... really...

[edit] I guess if you mean scripting languages I've learned HTML, javascript, 3DML(I think you have to pay to use this anymore. It was from a company called Flatland), and VRML. If you are refering to any other media I've also used and learned Flash 4 through Flash MX. I've learned how to use Photoshop 6.0 and 7.0. and 3D Studio MAX R3 and R4(and I may soon purchase R5).

I study a lot, I really don't have time for anything else.

Why sleep? You can do that when your dead.

(Hope you don't mind if I borrow this: )

[edited by - DocKode on January 23, 2003 11:33:17 PM]

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thanks guys, thats a really helped me out. i went out and grabbed one of those c++ for dummies books and im sure im gonna get alot more.

oh one more question, would you recomend trying to teach yourself c++ from a book or would it be better to take a course.
thanks

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Well in a course you can always ask the tutor to clarify something you don''t understand in the notes, however with a book you can learn at your own pace (for example my C++ programming class at Uni was very slow to accomodate some people who frankly didn''t want to be there in the first place).

I''d use a book, and then if there''s anything you aren''t 100% sure of you can always search for a more indepth article on the web.


pan narrans | My Website | Study + Hard Work + Loud Profanity = Good Code

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I''d recommend using a book and teaching yourself, but that is because I enjoy learning that way and have foun it effective. However, if you prefer somebody explaining things to you in person and getting assignments etc. then you might do better with a course.
Whichever route you choose, be sure to at least have a few books lying around to supplement you. A language reference is always handy (although MSDN isn''t bad).

Good luck.

-Mezz

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It is hard to say which is better, teach yourself or learn in a class setting. When you teach yourself you go at your own pace and you can decide which chapters you want to read and which you want to skip. When you learn in a class, sometimes you are forced to do those chapters that you would otherwise skip (discipline).

For example, I just took my Assembly Language class at college. I thought I had a handle on assembly language, because I have read two books on the subject. But in those two books, I always skipped over hardware interrupts and graphics programming at the hardware level. But in the class, if you wanted a good grade, it was insistant on understanding hardware interrupts and graphics programming.

It was kinda tuff to learn those two concepts and I don't think I would have been able to do it if I was teaching myself (I usually skip the stuff that don't interest me). Sometimes when you teach yourself, the discipline isn't there, and you end up bypassing or ignoring the "hard" stuff. But in a class setting, you get homework assigned that is insistant on knowing that stuff. Since this was a class, I was forced to reread the chapters until I fully understood those two subjects.

Since our final was based on both of those subjects, I could not just skip them as I had done in the two previous Assembly Language books I had read. That just one of the reasons why a class setting is sometimes better; not to mention the instructor taught us how to code the MIPS and AVR processor (awesome!!)

-aNona

[edited by - aNonaMuss on January 20, 2003 9:35:04 PM]

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Well I''m 20 and have been learning HTML for 2 weeks so take that! Hehe...I''m an English major focusing on dramatic writing (aka game storylines/world creation) so my IQ doesn''t have to be higher than the temperature at which water boils You guys and girls amaze me nonetheless with your intellect, keep it up! Its people like you that let me pursue my dreams of creative writing :D

Nefarsai
~Sociopolitical Creative Strategist

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OK, here is my answer.
I''m 23 now, I bought a PC when I was 20. I began programming at 21, with Pascal, Delphi, C - C++, OpenGL, SDL, and so on. I''m going to the university, and that helps, but is not everything, I could learn all the stuff by myself, but the university keeps you going.
And let me tell you:
- I don''t like math''s, but I learned it
- I never programmed before
- I''m a musician, besides I''m studiying something else (Engineering)
- Anyone can learn, just start to do it.

Sorry about my english...

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I am 47 and my answer is "yes." I started learning Basic for DOS in 1989 when I was 31. I went from Basic to QBasic, Pascal, C, C++, then to Delphi. In the 16 years I have learned what I have, I know it is harder for me to learn now but not because of my brain. It''s more of my other body parts just hurting more than they used to and distractions.

I also used to be able to focus on one thing better. I remember being able to sit and read a tech book for hours. Now I have to take several breaks, like every 30 minutes. Believe me, when older people tell you to take care of yourself while you are young, take their advice! Everything comes back to you someday no matter how invulnerable you think you are or feel.

Hope that helps from this old fart!

Larry.

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I learned Basic when I was 14 by programming graphing calculators during class when I should have been learning. Im 18 now and know 5 languages (well) and am learning x86 assembly, which is, to say the least, a bit harder. So long as you take the time to understand ''why'' something works and not just ''that'' it works you''ll have no problem blasting through c++.

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I''d say that age is not exactly critical when it comes to
learning any programming language. I''ve started, at the age of four, guided and teached by my grandfather, to type simple BASIC programs from magazines into my TS 2068, then switched to an SVI 728 Spectravideo at the age of 7 and finally to a PC 286 at the age of 10, learnt ASM and Pascal at the age of 13, I started using VB at the age of 14, and finally started learning C++ at the age of 15. Now I''m 20 and, after analyzing retrospectively my what and how I''ve learnt during my life, I''d say the best age to start is 14. Not only because you start thinking different, but because you start learning at school what you need to understand some aspects that you weren''t able to understand before. And, you have enough time to spend entire weeks learning... IMHO, what makes it harder to learn after a certain age is the lack of time to study, and not one''s age.

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The first thing I want to say is that AGE IS NOT A PROBLEM!!!

I started to use computers at 8, learning HTML (very complex knowledge of it, using a HTML programming bible ;0!) then about half a year later moved to VB. I used VB and HTML for a while, but decided I needed something new. I began to expirement around with all diffreent languages, but my eye got caught on C. I used C for about 3 years, and when I was 11/12, I got into C++. Using C and C++ was in dos until last year when I started using MFC, SDL, DirectX, and different stuff. Right now, I have limited DX knowledge, but i'm pretty proficent in MFC, but mainly C++.

Therefore, age is NOT a problem.


Oh, btw, i'm 14 .

Also forgot to say i'm learning ASM on a graphing calc in math class...haha, and no thats not part of the course! :D

[edited by - CortePlaneta on January 20, 2003 12:00:01 AM]

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Age in physical form doesn't always proportionate to learning capabilities. A more direct relation to learning capabilities are the mental 'age'... or what we call 'maturity' (well, a quite subjective one too)

Babies can't learn programming. That doesn't mean it is the age that stop them doing it, but it's the 'age' of the babies' mind that made them incapable of learning programming at that time. Nor all grandpa can learn programming language from scratch.

quote:

i was just wondering if it gets any harder for you to learn a programming language\gaming concepts as you get older.


No. It only get harder and harder if you learn it with a close-minded and feel bad if you know you are going to forget the ol'Bag of Tricks (tm) you had learned many years ago.

[edited by - DerekSaw on January 20, 2003 12:55:04 AM]

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I didn''t read all of it, but I think age doesn''t matter -- someone else mentioned maturity, and I agree. Also your schooling and stuff too. I couldn''t do what I do now without trig and calc (though I did try :D) Age itself though is just a unit of measurement man arbitrarily decided on. All time is (I think?)

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Hi all,

Just thought I would add my words. I am 37, yup you read that right, and I am sure I am the oldest poster here, I challenge to those older out there!

I have been learning C++ on my own for about six months now and agree that age is a factor, in so much as I don''t have as much free time as say an teenager or young adult may have. That and the fact the the older you get the harder it is to learn new things.

But I think I am doing well, and with the help of my friend Will, a spry 13 year old, I am learning at a much quicker pace I think.

Anyone out there remember FORTRAN, Modula-2, or Tandy BASIC?

Thanks,
Don

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Yes.



Just kidding. Not as long as you''re willing to put in the effort; I''m guessing unless you''re starting to get senile that age won''t play a factor. With older people getting set in their ways (I''m thinking 60+) it''s probably more of an unwillingness to keep learning new things more often than not.

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