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Warcraft III program language

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Does anyone knows in what language was Warcraft III programmed? Oh, by the way, is 320x240 the resolution used in consoles such SEGA Genesis or Super Nes and, yet by the way, what does the consoles bits mean, is the color depth? ( the bits I mean are like Super Nes is 16 bit console while the old Nintendo is only 8 bits). Thanks

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Yeah, I believe that the console bits mean the color depth. However, if you take a look at the original Mario Brothers and Mario 3, it almost is like the graphics are better, so it''s harder to say. Yet in the same breathe, Sega later got into polygon usage, so the bits per second had to be higher, to add more depth. Does this answer your question on consoles? -Tay

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Yeah, I believe that the console bits mean the color depth. However, if you take a look at the original Mario Brothers and Mario 3, it almost is like the graphics are better, so it''s harder to say. Yet in the same breathe, Sega later got into polygon usage, so the bits per second had to be higher, to add more depth. Does this answer your question on consoles? -Tay

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Actually, I was always under the impression that the bits had to do with the amount of bits for the data types, along the same lines of how Win3.1 is 16 bit and Win95+ is 32, and now they are even making 64 bit OSs.

The above poster beat me =P

[edited by - Lunatic Raven on January 27, 2003 10:48:16 PM]

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Yup, i'm just to fast for ya . The cpu bit depth is how many bits it can process at one time (or, the default it can anyways.. some 32-bit cpu's can process 64 bits at a time, but the default is still 32, same with the nintendo.. it was an 8-bit cpu, but you could use 16-bit integers on it, if you couldn't, you wouldn't be able to store a number large enough for a vertical resolution of 320 pixels).

** Edit **
By the way, the OS has nothing to do with the cpu bit depth... win 3.1 was a 16-bit addon to a 16-bit operating system (dos), which was originally written on/for a 16-bit cpu... it runs on 32-bit cpu's because they are backwards compatible, but natively were made for 32-bit data.

[edited by - Ready4Dis on January 27, 2003 10:58:41 PM]

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quote:
Original post by dannyxyz23
Pretty much. Still, have you got a guess about Warcraft III programming language?
thanks


reliable sources told me that it was coded in visual basic

-eldee
;another space monkey;
[ Forced Evolution Studios ]


::evolve::

Do NOT let Dr. Mario touch your genitals. He is not a real doctor!

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LOL, how reliable were they? I highly doubt it was made in VB, but you never know. I beleive they have always used C and C++ in the past, and don''t see why they would revert to Visual Basic for a more advanced 3d engine. I would hazzard a guess that it was written in C or C++. Considering visual basic would be a *pain* to create dynamic units/buildings and such (no linked lists, and creating a new array, copying data, rediming current array, copying data back, and deleting new array isn''t efficient enough to fill in). Maybe a map editor was written in VB, but I highly doubt the game or game engine was.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I''m guessing that eldee was trying to make a joke. Poking around in the binaries reveals that Warcraft III was written in C++ (Visual C++ specifically).

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Precisely, Watson! On further inspection, I can say without a doubt that it was an orc that perpetrated this crime. Specifically, a green orc. One who is left-handed and was carrying a large weight on his right shoulder.

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quote:
Original post by Ready4Dis
LOL, how reliable were they? I highly doubt it was made in VB, but you never know. I beleive they have always used C and C++ in the past, and don't see why they would revert to Visual Basic for a more advanced 3d engine. I would hazzard a guess that it was written in C or C++. Considering visual basic would be a *pain* to create dynamic units/buildings and such (no linked lists, and creating a new array, copying data, rediming current array, copying data back, and deleting new array isn't efficient enough to fill in). Maybe a map editor was written in VB, but I highly doubt the game or game engine was.


heh, apparently, i left my < sarcasm > tag open...


-eldee
;another space monkey;
[ Forced Evolution Studios ]


::evolve::

Do NOT let Dr. Mario touch your genitals. He is not a real doctor!


[edited by - eldee on January 27, 2003 11:12:31 PM]

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Thank you all.
Just because everyone is tunned could you just tell me how would I draw a shape, like a rectangle for instance, in C. But I Mean IN REAL RAW C CODE, without using graphic libraries such as Allegro, Directx or OpenGL. Would I have to assemble it, or something like? By the way, drawing an image to the screen is just like changing the values of the video memory in the exact place where it displays it? I am not so sure I know how it works?!?

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You don''t, except maybe in old OSes that didn''t protect hardware and memory and prevent direct access. You would have to use some kind of graphics library in windows, be it the GDI, open GL, direct x, etc.

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While you could write the routines directly to the devices rather than use an API, this is what you limit yourself to:
the parts on YOUR computer.

If you use APIs like OpenGL or something, you allow your program to run on more than just your specific video card. Same goes for other devices, like sound.

While I find it great that you want to deal with all code yourself, there is actually a name for that: The Not-Built-Here mantra.
This is not usually considered a good thing.

In any case, the previous poster is right. If you use DOS (might I mention using QBasic?) or an older OS that doesn''t provide APIs directly, then you can use assembly all you want to deal with video and sound.

Other than that, learning an API ensures your program works on more than just your machine.

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quote:
Original post by Ready4Dis
...and creating a new array, copying data, rediming current array, copying data back, and deleting new array isn''t efficient enough to fill in...


Hm, is that supposed to resize a dynamic array without deleting the existing data? You could just use "ReDim Preserve..." for that...

(just trying to be smart)

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Guest Anonymous Poster

You can also have linked lists in VB, if you code them
yourself, but its harder to get them to work well with all different data types. You could use variants, I guess, but its still messy


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