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GameDude1

C++ vs C# for DirectX9 programming

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I''ve noticed that MS is pushing harder and harder on C# for programming, including support in newer DirectX version. Just curious what your thoughts are on C# vs C++ for DirectX9 game programming. Why would / and when would one use C# instead of C++? Advantages / Disadvantages of doing so?? Thanks, *gd*

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imho i think that there is a time and a place for both. Different jobs require different tools.

For example if you want to prototype a new graphics routine, or game idea then c# would be a logical choice due to speed of development.

However, if you need to get every frame of performance out of your app then perhaps C++ would be a better choice.

It''s all down to what you want to do.

There is also the option of mixing the two languages, for example having "engine" in C++ and the gamecode in C#.

ideas?

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IMHO

When the install time and space requirements of Visual Studio .NET ( hence C#/C++ ) gets closer to that of Visual Studio 6, I will be sticking with Visual C++ 6 / DirectX 9.

2+ Hours of install time -and-
2+ GB of disk space

Is not worth the effort for me.

- J

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Of course they push it, it is their own language, sure they want people to use it. Just think back a couple of years when Java came and where it is today. C# will go the same way. Of course I can be wrong but somehow I don't think so. Don't take it as if I don't like c# or something. I am just trying to be realistic. C# looks quite good for general things.


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Try RealityRift at www.planetrift.com


[edited by - MichaelT on January 28, 2003 3:21:44 PM]

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Thanks for the replies! I appreciate everyone taking the time to respond to this. I''m fairly new to game developement, and was curious if anyone else was considering C#. I''ve been impressed with the ease of C# development compared to C++, but did not know if it was practical in game development. I like the idea of use C# to mock up or use combination of the two. Very good ideas...

Thanks guys,



*gd*

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quote:
Original post by joutlaw
IMHO

When the install time and space requirements of Visual Studio .NET ( hence C#/C++ ) gets closer to that of Visual Studio 6, I will be sticking with Visual C++ 6 / DirectX 9.

2+ Hours of install time -and-
2+ GB of disk space

Is not worth the effort for me.

- J


This is a pretty moronic statement if you realize that the install of VS.NET includes the full updated MSDN - not the "small outdated stuff" that came with VC 6. And this alone accounts for three CD''s (which are not installed totally)

The core VS.NET install runs well below 750 Mb. You can safely turn off most options - I mean, after all your statement prooves you have no need for the tools for building enterprise applications coming with VS.NET

BTW - never looked at the last hard disc sizes? And I also assume you dont want to write standards compliant code.

Well, ignorance :-)




Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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quote:
Original post by GameDude1
I''ve noticed that MS is pushing harder and harder on C# for programming, including support in newer DirectX version. Just curious what your thoughts are on C# vs C++ for DirectX9 game programming. Why would / and when would one use C# instead of C++? Advantages / Disadvantages of doing so??



As a hobbyist game developer i realise i wont be writing doom 3 in the near future so i dont mind a relatively small performance hit in the software i write.

As a programmer, i find C# a well designed language, which C++ simply isnt. Only zealots would claim otherwise. As a programmer, i dont like wasting time over the intricasies of C and C++ - e.g. header files - How redundant.

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sark, thats a pretty good point of view, IMHO. There are pretty little games that require TOP NOTCH performance today in the graphics field and where the difference will make a huge difference.

Time to market is more crucial here :-)


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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That depends on what you mean by top notch games?

But to be more specific and I know I didn''t answer this question myself since my knowledge in c# is far too small. But so far nobody has answered the question about advantages and disadvantages between the two (not just c++).

____________________________________________________________
Try RealityRift at www.planetrift.com

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quote:
Original post by sark

As a hobbyist game developer i realise i wont be writing doom 3 in the near future so i dont mind a relatively small performance hit in the software i write.

As a programmer, i find C# a well designed language, which C++ simply isnt. Only zealots would claim otherwise. As a programmer, i dont like wasting time over the intricasies of C and C++ - e.g. header files - How redundant.



I tend to differ... I'd like to add a little disclaimer though, as I've NEVER worked with C# in my life, so I might be wrong.
You could also look at it this way: As a hobbyist you won't have the knowledge or sources to optimise every little piece of a game or formula, so the hit you take of you language might be bigger then you first expect.
I agree that as a hobbyist you don't have to look that critical at performance, but it will ALWAYS be an important factor in games. And speed has to come from some place: either your algorithms, or your language.

______________________________
"A computer is meant to be a big calculator, not a storage device"
Struct.m33p.net

[edited by - Structural on January 29, 2003 10:10:09 AM]

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