Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

alain_desilets

My 10yr old son wants to write a computer game

Recommended Posts

alain_desilets    122
I am a programmer with 15 years of experience but no game development (or even computer graphics) experience. My 10yr old son would like to write a computer game with me. He would do the game design and maybe some of the graphics and I would handle all the programming side. I am aware that most games are multi-million dollar projects that take 1 to 2 years to complete, so I have to manage his expectations. Here are some alternatives I thought of: A) creating a simple 2D or quasi 3D game (pac-man or supermario style) B) joining an OpenSource project that''s developing a game Can anyone suggest other alternatives? For alternative A), can anyone suggest books, web sites, toolkits that would help a very amateur game developer and his son to build such a simple game? Note that I haven''t written a line of C/C++ in 8 years and hope that won''t change. Nowadays, I do most of my programming in perl, Python and Java (often connecting them to C/C++ libraries so I can use their high-performance code from a language where I don''t have to worrry about such menial things as memory management). For alterntive B), can anyone suggest an OpenSource project that''s building a game that a 10yr old and his dad could take part in (no shoot-em-up Quake types of games of course). Thx Alain Désilets Research Officer National Research Council of Canada BTW: I tried to access the archives of this mailing list at: http://www.tpu.org/pipermail/tpu-gamedev/ but got a Not Found error.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sark    104
First thing i want to say is that i think its cool that you want to help your son with making his game.

To look for open-source projects, www.sourceforge.net and www.freshmeat.net.

If you do find a suitable team, then im not sure how they''d feel about you wanting to use your son''s graphics in their game. As you have experience in Python and Java, i''d advise you look into graphics/input/sound libraries for both of these languages and write it yourself. I''ve never used it, but pyGame (a Python game library) is apparently pretty good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OrangyTang    1298
quote:
Original post by alain_desilets
Nowadays, I do most of my programming in perl,
Python and Java (often connecting them to C/C++ libraries so I can use
their high-performance code from a language where I don''t
have to worrry
about such menial things as memory management).


Have a look at this lib, and visit here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Taylor    122
AWESOME! Another fellow game developer. AT AGE 10 EVEN! COOL.
ANYWAY, check out GAME MAKER 4.0. Type in "Game Maker" at google.com. It''s free and it is minimal coding. It is very simple to use depending on what you want to build. Plus if you want to learn how to code in C++, it has a optional scripting language you could use for bigger and better products. Hopefully that helps! Happy programming!
-Taylor

EMAIL: music_dreamer@hotmail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
felonius    122
Alain Desilets,

I think it is great that your son shows interest in making computer games. I started myself when I was 11 and that has later given me a good job in the industry.

Personally I would recommend buying

DARKbasic (www.darkbasic.com)

for the young beginnger. It costs a little but the price is reasonable and then you get all you need to get started making games and complete a few small ones.

Later when he gets more proficient he can begin to play with the more advanced/professional stuff but at the moment what he really needs is to get some immediate successes in what he does and here DARKbasic is great.



Jacob Marner, M.Sc.
Console Programmer, Deadline Games

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
exepotes    133
you could try PySDL (or something like that) at www.libsdl.org in the "Libraries" part. it''s easy.
or may be you could try with some ''toolkit'' like DarkBasic, BlitzBasic, and so on...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
exepotes    133
oh, i forget: ''PySDL is a Python module that provides access to the SDL library''s functionality'' (SDL is a library usually used for game programming)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alain: You are using outdated thinking. You apparently think it''s necessary to use C/C++ to write a game, but it isn''t. You are free to use Java or Visual Basic or DarkBASIC. DarkBASIC has a built-in 3D engine. I''m not sure how good it is but it''s certainly adequate for a puzzle game. And there''s a 3D API for Java called Java3D.

~CGameProgrammer( );

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neurokaotix    100
I wish my dad would program 3D games with me :
I would start with some simple 2D games in a language you are comfortable and then perhaps work into something 3D. You can search on google.com for the TrueVision3D engine (its free) and it interfaces well with Visual Basic. You should no problem at all getting to learn it.

Have fun

[edited by - neurokaotix on January 30, 2003 2:26:44 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NRMStudios    122
Awesome that your programming with your son. I have used both DarkBasic and something called BlitzBasic. I found blits to be much easier to use. You can dl a demo for free and if you like it you can buy it for only 125us. Take a look at some of the screen shot of what i developed with Blitz here

http://www.geocities.com/NRMStudios/downloads.html

and Blitz''s site here

http://www.BlizBasic.com

good luck

Nos Obligatus Peto Veritas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fruny    1658
Given your experience PyGame (www.pygame.org), the aforementioned set of Python binding to SDL (www.libsdl.org) is probably the simplest and fastest way to get started.

As for Open Source projects, I''m afraid all I can suggest is a search on SourceForge or Freshmeat.


[ Start Here ! | How To Ask Smart Questions | Recommended C++ Books | C++ FAQ Lite | Function Ptrs | CppTips Archive ]
[ Header Files | File Format Docs | LNK2001 | C++ STL Doc | STLPort | Free C++ IDE | Boost C++ Lib | MSVC6 Lib Fixes ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MDI    266
quote:
Original post by CGameProgrammer
alain: You are using outdated thinking. You apparently think it''s necessary to use C/C++ to write a game, but it isn''t. You are free to use Java or Visual Basic or DarkBASIC. DarkBASIC has a built-in 3D engine. I''m not sure how good it is but it''s certainly adequate for a puzzle game. And there''s a 3D API for Java called Java3D.

~CGameProgrammer( );


Isn''t Java3D going to be deprecated sometime soon? I always preferred GL4Java anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
wenching    122
Well alain_desilets.

You have 2 options to choose.

1) you can start using c++ with directx 8.1 or 9. You can learn up how to the use the directx API and do something small like Asteroid.

2) Use a existing 3d engine. And do something big. Truevision3d is a good choice. And it is easy for beginners. Currently not supported for c++.

If you want to go for 2d games, download GameVision engine.

If for web, use wildtangent with java/javascript.

Regards,
Chua Wen Ching :D

"Very new to games I think"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mmx87    122
I would not suggest DirectX to a beginner...its not portable to other OS'es, its slow, it is made by Microsoft (who I and many other Linux users don't like ) and it is just not n00b-friendly.

What I would recommend, is if you are in Windows, use OpenGL and start drawing some primitive quads and triangles, and then start to rotate those things, then texture map them, and just build up until you get to a 3D engine.

If you are on Linux, I would use Allegro if you wanted to do a 2D game, and AllegroGL if you wanted to do 3D games (or you can use java3d, whatever you perfer, I am just listing the C/C++ options).

Hope you can get a game going!

mmx87

[edited by - mmx87 on January 30, 2003 8:55:07 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
alain_desilets    122
On behalf of my son (Mathieu) and myself, I would like to thank all of you who replied to this message. You have made this look possible.

I will try some of the options mentioned on this page, and will be sure to report on our experience.

Alain Désilets

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by mmx87
I would not suggest DirectX to a beginner...its slow


Speaking as someone who uses both, I can say it''s faster than OpenGL. Well it really depends on how you use each, but my engine uses static buffers for geometry that changes rarely (like, once every 1-3 seconds). Direct3D allows me to edit the buffers when they do need to be updated, but OpenGL forces me to delete them and create entirely new ones. Therefore when moving I get ~35 FPS with D3D and ~14 FPS with OpenGL. When standing still I get ~40 FPS with D3D and ~40 with OpenGL. Using only dynamic buffers for both, I get ~27 FPS with D3D and ~22 FPS with OpenGL, though OpenGL surpasses Direct3D in windowed mode, ironically.

Your other criticisms of Direct3D are perfectly valid.

~CGameProgrammer( );

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites