Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

I NEED YOUR HELP!(Click HERE!)

This topic is 5434 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi. I was wondering. How do you start to build a game? I know the basics of C/C++, classes, structs, variables, functions, etc etc, bs, bs. I can program...programs, just as far as games go, I don''t know where to start. I want to build a 2D, old-fashioned Zelda style game. Now, I know I should take baby steps like space invaders, but for now, I just want a guy to walk up, down, left, right. I can draw, do music and all I just need is a push into dealing with directx...8. I got the 2D engine found in "Tricks of the Windows game programming gurus", and sad to say that is difficult. The author (cough)LaMothe confuses me. There are total newbies getting a better head start off of thin air and QBasic. All I am asking for is a starting point. I want to write the game, not the rez, video drivers, COM objects, dot dot dot...Help me please. Thank you for your time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you go to DirectX 8-9 you''re stuck with COM. Personally I prefer OpenGL because:

1. It''s not Microsoft
2. It''s easier and faster
3. It''s not Microsoft

Try http://nehe.gamedev.net to learn about OpenGL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DirectX is the best, because, it is Microsoft.
It is not easy, but faster then opengl and it has more possibility. However if you are a beginner in making games you should try allegro.

www.allegro.cc


Nothing and all, by some meaning, no difference

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK ok Ok. Aside from the ANTI-MICROSOFT thing, honestly which is better to start in...OpenGL? or DirectX. I want to make a strategy simulation and I need speed and an excellent audio driver support. Which is it? And where can I find a great OpenGL with all the documentation on how to use it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Honestly, it doesn''t matter, especially when you''re starting out. They aren''t very different. Flip a coin.


Don''t listen to me. I''ve had too much coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by wild_pointer
I'm so glad people base decisions about which api to use based on your misguided ill-informed hatred of microsoft.

It really makes you look stupid to people who know better.



[My site|SGI STL|Bjarne FAQ|C++ FAQ Lite|MSDN|Jargon]
Ripped off from various people


or from their fan boys too ?

[edited by - Metal Typhoon on January 29, 2003 11:43:46 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, I love some microsoft products and disdain others just to get that out of the way. Visual studio, visual source safe and such really rock. I also love linux. To base your programming language on your hatred of a company is really asinine though. If they make a good product use it, if they don''t then throw it out. I say the people that bash microsoft products as inferior haven''t tried other operating systems development environments and are basing their decision on slashdot. While linux is fine to use and all, gcc sucks. As well as do their ide''s and debuggers (ankjstra, visual slick edit ddd, xgdb and such). Use the right tools for the right job. Microsoft''s DirectX is a wonderful API. WHile I really and truly do adore it, I myself believe opengl to be better for a beginner. Many windowing api''s (qt, glut, sdl <-also can be used for your games) make opengl useable without having to hastle with the windows or xwindows api or whatever. Once you have a grasp of opengl, learn the windows api, and then pick which you like better, because you will have a better knowledge of the material, you will better be able to choose, and you will get to that point faster using opengl in my opinion. Also, Optimus, directx isn''t proven to be any faster, or opengl for that matter. And just because it belongs to microsoft doesn''t make it any better (ever used windows 95 or outlook? (shudder)). You are right (partially) about more possibilies but at the same time still wrong. The directx api makes some of the more tedious things (model loading, writing huge matrix and vector functions) much more simple. That does not mean it has more possibilities though. Almost all of the functionality is comes with can also be done using opengl, it may just be a bit more time consuming. Opengl also makes some things much easier. For a beginner, try drawing polygons. With opengl, say you want to draw a 360 sided polygon. Make a parametric equation and go. Directx, make it either out of lines or triangles, which maybe a beginner should learn later. I made pretty neat 2d polygon stuff when I was a total beginner, which I would have had a lot harder time with using directx. Reason being, imagine a newbie trying to make a game of breakout (one of my firsts). The ball can be incredibly simple to draw using opengl, but with direct graphics, it''s a little harder. Once you are proficient at the basics, both api''s have basically the same principle, it''s just a matter of choosing which you like more. I like both equally. But do yourself a favor and start with opengl, and save yourself a lot of headache. Directx has a lot of functions, and they are all things you can do with opengl, but save yourself the headache and learn it the easy way first, then go on to directx and learn all of the great power all of the added functions give you. Then decide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by xg0blin
Ok, I love some microsoft products and disdain others just to get that out of the way. Visual studio, visual source safe and such really rock. I also love linux. To base your programming language on your hatred of a company is really asinine though. If they make a good product use it, if they don't then throw it out. I say the people that bash microsoft products as inferior haven't tried other operating systems development environments and are basing their decision on slashdot. While linux is fine to use and all, gcc sucks. As well as do their ide's and debuggers (ankjstra, visual slick edit ddd, xgdb and such). Use the right tools for the right job. Microsoft's DirectX is a wonderful API. WHile I really and truly do adore it, I myself believe opengl to be better for a beginner. Many windowing api's (qt, glut, sdl <-also can be used for your games) make opengl useable without having to hastle with the windows or xwindows api or whatever. Once you have a grasp of opengl, learn the windows api, and then pick which you like better, because you will have a better knowledge of the material, you will better be able to choose, and you will get to that point faster using opengl in my opinion. Also, Optimus, directx isn't proven to be any faster, or opengl for that matter. And just because it belongs to microsoft doesn't make it any better (ever used windows 95 or outlook? (shudder)). You are right (partially) about more possibilies but at the same time still wrong. The directx api makes some of the more tedious things (model loading, writing huge matrix and vector functions) much more simple. That does not mean it has more possibilities though. Almost all of the functionality is comes with can also be done using opengl, it may just be a bit more time consuming. Opengl also makes some things much easier. For a beginner, try drawing polygons. With opengl, say you want to draw a 360 sided polygon. Make a parametric equation and go. Directx, make it either out of lines or triangles, which maybe a beginner should learn later. I made pretty neat 2d polygon stuff when I was a total beginner, which I would have had a lot harder time with using directx. Reason being, imagine a newbie trying to make a game of breakout (one of my firsts). The ball can be incredibly simple to draw using opengl, but with direct graphics, it's a little harder. Once you are proficient at the basics, both api's have basically the same principle, it's just a matter of choosing which you like more. I like both equally. But do yourself a favor and start with opengl, and save yourself a lot of headache. Directx has a lot of functions, and they are all things you can do with opengl, but save yourself the headache and learn it the easy way first, then go on to directx and learn all of the great power all of the added functions give you. Then decide.

I've just realized why my technical writing teacher stresses short, consise, easily readable paragraphs .

Please edit this post and break it up into at least 6 or so paragraphs so I can read it.

(don't mind me...it's late and my contacts are giving me a headache)





[edited by - Qa303asmGuru on January 29, 2003 11:49:23 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanx for the help guys, but OpenGL would now require me to buy a flippin book. I just bought "Windows Game programming for dummies" a year and a half ago and now "Tricks of the Windows Game programming Gurus" by the same author, LaMothe and I tell you what that is some trick shtuff. I dunno really where to start but I might try that allegro.cc whatever the hell that is...lol. Thanx again.
-Taylor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You don''t need to buy a book. opengl.org has the red book and the blue book which are totally free. Oh yeah, good thing this isn''t technical writing class, and is rather just an internet forum. Otherwise we might not be able to mispell words, and might have to format sentences and such when we''re quickly trying to give someone some advice and move on with out lives. Thanks grammer dude, I woulnd''t know what to do without you. And you''ll have to excuse me as well, I'' a little cranky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Taylor
I want to make a strategy simulation and I need speed and an excellent audio driver support. Which is it?



OpenGL has NO audio support, so you''ll probably be using DirectAudio (or a 3rd party library) for that.

The same goes for input. OpenGL has NO input support, so you''ll probably be using DirectInput (or a 3rd party library) for that.

Hmmm... you might as well go with DirectX.

For the record, I like OpenGL, too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites