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Mescalito

Do you think using Visual Basic is programming ?

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owl    376
If you knew what programming is, you wouldn''t ask that question.

Visual Basic acomplish all the requirements to be a programming language, therefor, making visual basic proguies is programming.

If you are being sarcastic, programming dosn''t have to be difficult in order to be worthy. And it''s very possible to make very usefull programs with vb with 1/4 of the people necesary to make them with c++, and in 1/4 of the time. You just need a computer 3/4 more powerfull to run the app.

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Subotron    182
"Do you think using Visual Basic is programming?"

I hope you don''t mean to place yourself above VB programmers, because that would make me place you BENEATH them... I think Visual Basic certainly should be called ''programming'', whatever that word may mean to you. I think it can be more ''programming'' than C++ in some way, since you are programming higher level and thus you spend more time on thinking how to program the game/application/demo/whatever than on reinventing the wheel by doing everything low-level.

I hope this gives you a new sight to programming. Just for the record: I''ve been programming C++ 2 years now, before that I programmed (visual) basic for about 8 years. I think I can say I know the difference quite well and C++ is not much different from VB, just lower-level.

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skap20    122
Yes, Visual Basic is programming. Just because it''s higher level than languages like C++ doesn''t mean it isn''t real programming. I personally use both Visual Basic and C++, depending on the project. I prefer C++, but sometimes I am working on a project that doesn''t require totally optimized code and I don''t want to bother with low level programming.

Nicholas Skapura
skapura.2@wright.edu
http://skap.8k.com
AIM: skap35

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ragonastick    134
I love these language flamebaits . But what I really would like to so is some examples of work by those who knock languages.

Trying is the first step towards failure.

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owl    376
quote:
Original post by ragonastick
I love these language flamebaits . But what I really would like to so is some examples of work by those who knock languages.

Trying is the first step towards failure.


hehe what you mean?

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Extrarius    1412
Several of my friends would say that PHP, Python, ASP, *.Net, etc are all scripting and not programming. All of them are ''scripters'' in their own words, so they aren''t meaning it in a derogitory way.

----------
crAzy

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Evangelion    122
VB is certainly a programming language - its just not as powerful as C++ is. I really think VB is kinda annoying to use for game programming because of the overhead involved, but it is very useful for quick tools.

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Martee    476
quote:
Original post by Extrarius
Several of my friends would say that PHP, Python, ASP, *.Net, etc are all scripting and not programming.

So what''s the difference between programming and scripting?

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niyaw    158
what about c#/vb.net/java, which compile to bytecode?

i''d say that scripting is writing code to be interpreted, while programming is writing code to be compiled.

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Dean Harding    546
quote:
Original post by niyaw
i''d say that scripting is writing code to be interpreted, while programming is writing code to be compiled.



So what''s the point of even making a distinction like that?

If I had my way, I''d have all of you shot!


codeka.com - Just click it.

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daerid    354
Program:

n. A set of coded instructions that enables a machine, especially a computer, to perform a desired sequence of operations

v. To provide (a machine) with a set of coded working instructions

Thereforce, programming would be the act of v. above.

Therefore, scripting is scripting, while the reverse is not necessarily true.

[edited by - daerid on February 1, 2003 3:04:24 AM]

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fup    463
Mescalito: setting the timer on your video recorder is ''programming''. Haven''t you got better things to do with your time than ask such mind numbingly stupid questions? My cat can think better than that. (and it''s a stupid cat)


I can''t believe I even responded...






ai-junkie.com

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LNK2001    218
quote:
Original post by daerid
Therefore, scripting is scripting, while the reverse is not necessarily true.

That''s a very interesting typo...(?)

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Oluseyi    2103
quote:
Original post by niyaw
what about c#/vb.net/java, which compile to bytecode?

i''d say that scripting is writing code to be interpreted, while programming is writing code to be compiled.

Hmm. Did you know that before LISP, the only decision construct in any programming language (which at the time basically meant FORTRAN) was a conditional goto? LISP gave us the if statement - which I''m sure you will agree is a programming language construct - and yet has always been an interpreted language, though JIT compilation blurs such distinctions.

C#, VB.Net and Java compile to bytecode (so does Python, incidentally), which is then converted/compiled at some point into machine language instructions which are executed by the CPU. C++ compiles directly to machine language instructions (with an optional intermediate assembly language stage), which are then executed by the CPU. I can''t really say I see the big difference; instructions get executed in the end, don''t they?

In fact, straight-to-binary languages present a disadvantage in that they have a longer development cycle: you need to attempt to compile, then correct syntax errors, then compile, then test, then debug, then compile, then test, then debug... until you finally hope you''ve eliminated all logic errors and release the product. Programs written in languages that are interpreted (even if they can generate native code) can be developed faster because of the elimination of intermediate compiles, usually less language overhead (ignoring C++-influenced languages like Java and C# most of them allow you to write one-line programs with no "entry point" function/method), much more powerful edit-and-resume capabilities, often more powerful reflection... The list goes on. And the only downside to them is supposedly performance, which is a non-issue when you add a JIT compiler or a native compiler.

Happy hacking.

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Subotron    182
quote:
HTML isn''t programming.


Don''t just make some stupid quote, but tell us WHY it isn''t. Else you could''ve just not post here. A message like this is useless. I agree that HTML is not a programming language (and HTML is certainly not PROGRAMMING ) but a markup language. The guy you quoted ALREADY SAID THIS so I don''t really see any point in your post... oh well... hmm

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RuneLancer    253
HTML isn''t programming. There are no variables involved, the effect is only limited, non-compilable... basically, I''d see this more as a scripting language, personally.

VB is a programming language. You can do just a great with VB as you would with C++. As proof, here''s a screenshot of an unfinished game I wrote in VB. It runs music using an SPC engine (yes, SNES music) even. The attempt was to recreate an SNES-like game.



Ran a little slow on slower computers, but hey, what can I say. VB is a little more of a hog than C++.

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SabreMan    504
quote:
Original post by RuneLancer
HTML isn''t programming. There are no variables involved, the effect is only limited, non-compilable...

The question of whether a language has variables or is compilable is not an arbiter of whether it is a programming language. You might say that HTML is not Turing-complete, and therefore is not a programming language. Or, you might say that a language needs to have a specification carrying semantics which describe how constructs can affect the state of the machine, which would rule out silly claims of XML being a programming language.
quote:

basically, I''d see this more as a scripting language, personally.

It''s a mark-up language.

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Mescalito    122
Hi everyone and thanks for all replies.

First I''d like to say that I didn''t think that so many people would be "hurt" by my question and that they would reply "injuring" me...
But you know programmers and their egos...

I NEVER wanted to say that Visual Basic wasn''t programming it was a SIMPLE question and I wanted YOUR OPINION !

So why did I post this question ?
I did 8 years programming and I used many languages to see what was this and that. I used Basic, Pascal, Visual Basic (!), C, Assembly, C++, Caml, Java.
Now I only use C/C++/Assembly.

I used VB for 2 years.
One day I''ve read that Visual Basic executables weren''t "real ones". They only contains calls to .dll and that explained why vb programs were so slow.

From this I started thinking that visual basic programs were another system of programming than "pure" languages that are assembly, pascal, c/c++.

So don''t feel hurt everytime we''re asking you something and be subjective ! No one really answered the question...

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
c++ and assembly are too high level. I code everything in binary!

Seriously who gives a shit.. just code and get better fucker

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