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Everything just white when lighting is disabled??

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How come? I want to render my scene with "unmodified" colors (I want all the pixels of an object to appear in color (255,0,0) when I set that color for instance). I disabled dithering and put the shading model to GL_FLAT. Something is still missing but I can''t find out! By the way I don''t do any texturing

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Are you setting the color at all with glColor3f()? And what do you mean by "unmodified" colors? And how did it look like with lighting enabled?

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That''s it! Thanks

I was setting colors with glMaterial...
I think I still didn''t understand the big difference between glMaterial and glColor. Which one is usually used when doing normal rendering (normal==with light influencing the appearance)? What about when I use textures in future, will I have to use glColor or glMaterial?
Can both commands be combined?

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glColor3f() sets the color being used at that time, and glMaterial sets how that material will reflect light I believe.

Later,


Michael Bartman

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Thanks!
Another quick question:

If I have a 16 bit color window and I am using glColor3ub(r,g,b), how are the single bytes (r,g or b) limited.

Obviously 16 bit is 2 bytes. But we have 3 bytes to specify the color and 16 bit/3 doesn't give a round number...
So if I set the color to glColor3ub(245,3,25) the color I will read in the pixels won't let me find back the 3 initial values (245,3,25).
What is the mapping?

Wait, I think I've found out: since there is always an alpha-value, we have 16 bit/4 = 4.
So this means there can't be more than 16 different values for each r,g,b or alpha-value, right?
So glColor3ub(2,16,255) would give me exactly the same color as glColor3ub(3,18,252), right?


[edited by - Floating on February 3, 2003 9:02:46 PM]

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I don''t think that glColor3ub converts the arguments to floats. I think it is rather the other way round.

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