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C++ The Complete Reference

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I am considering buying this book soon to learn a lot more about c++. I just want to know whether its a good buy and worth my $, or if there is a similar book that you could recommend?? And I''ve already read all the reviews on Amazon, but I want to really make sure this is the book for me. (Oh yeah, does it have a solid coverage of linked lists?)

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Lo,

C++: The Complete Reference By Herbert Schildt?

If so, it is a good book but mainly as a reference.

If you actually want to learn C++, I would recommend ''Teach Yourself C++'' by the same author. It starts from the very basics, upto the quite advanced giving exercises and plenty of examples throughout.

It assumes you do have at least a basic knowledge of C though.

Hope that helped....

CoiN

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I really like "thinking in C++" by bruce eckel.

download it legally from www.mindview.net

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To know whether it is the book for you we need to know about you. Tell us your experience of other languages, experience of c++, age, motivation etc.

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That book is pretty much my bible.

It has helped me through countless obstacles, so for me at least, it is a great buy. However, it is a reference book. So it is really meant for people who already know C++ but just want a reference.

--------------------
Nicholas Skapura
skapura.2@wright.edu
http://skap.8k.com
AIM: skap35

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If you are looking for a language reference (as opposed to a tutorial/learning book) you want either:

The Annotated C++ Reference Manual
by Margaret Ellis and Bjarne Stroustrup

or

The C++ Programming Language
by Bjarne Stroustrup

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Its a decent reference book, not good for learning from though. From time to time I''ve found things missing from this book and I''ve have to look elsewhere, like in the C++ standard itself. The book does cover the STL, but its only the commonly used features.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
All Hail the Mightiest programming-language-reference-book author of them all Herbert Schildt.

Don''t know what the rest of y''all are talking about, I easily learned by reading his books and I still use them as references as well.

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Hey thanks for the replies, but petewood you asked for my previous experience so you can recommend me something appropriate?

Ok, C++ is my first language and I have been learning it for about 4 months and have read "Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days", (lol,it took me longer than 21 days!!)
but want to further my skills with the language, and become confident with advanced topics. I am keen to learn and I spend most of my time away from school reading and coding.

Ok can you now recommend a book for me??

Well that question is too broad, but I'm trying
Thanks guys (and gals )

Oh yeah, I'm 14 if it matters...

[edited by - julienX on February 4, 2003 6:37:03 AM]

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14? that's a good time to learn a language, you'll have a lot of fun.

well, if you learned the basics and have a strong foundation, you can look around the internet for some advanced tutorials and guides, and then buy the C++: The Complete Reference book. i'm learning C++ in my computer science class right now (although we know considerably MUCH more than the instructor...it's not a very pretty sight when we contradict her, she's really retarded) and i have supplemented my course knowledge with online support, and now im going to go out and buy that book. woohoo! lol.

[edited by - sab3156 on February 4, 2003 8:17:27 PM]

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quote:
from the alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ FAQ
16: Why do many experts not think very highly of Herbert Schildt's
books?

A good answer to this question could fill a book by itself. While no book is perfect, Schildt's books, in the opinion of many gurus, seem to positively aim to mislead learners and encourage bad habits. Schildt's beautifully clear writing style only makes things worse by causing many "satisfied" learners to recommend his books to other learners.



Here is Google's cache of the ACCU review for that book, since the ACCU site is unfortunately down.

My conclusions :
- If you need an accurate reference you're much better off with "The C++ Language" by Stroustrup, possibly seconded by "The C++ Standard Library" by Josuttis.
- If you need a primer, "Essential C++" by Lipmann and "Accelerated C++" by Koenig & Moo are the way to go.

Coverage of linked lists is better done in a data structures or algorithms book. C++ does have a list class, which will be discussed in any and all of the aforementioned books.


[ Start Here ! | How To Ask Smart Questions | Recommended C++ Books | C++ FAQ Lite | Function Ptrs | CppTips Archive ]
[ Header Files | File Format Docs | LNK2001 | C++ STL Doc | STLPort | Free C++ IDE | Boost C++ Lib | MSVC6 Lib Fixes ]


[edited by - Fruny on February 5, 2003 2:55:17 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you template by this book, your acceptance will rise!

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''Accelerated c++'' koenig and moo - chew, digest, read again, ruminate.

I originally learned from ''the c++ primer plus'' which was enjoyable, amusing, clearly written etc. but had some faults. The examples were unrealistic, it wasn''t written with a deep understanding of object oriented ideas so was almost like C with classes, which seemed good for me at the time as I was coming from a C background. It was detrimental to me though as it has taken me years to get to grips with the ideas of encapsulation, contract, abstraction, polymorphism (buzz buzz buzz). Saying that though I think the experience of the writers is increasing all the time and better and better books are being written. Also there is more dross.

I recommend a book which understands classes as objects, uses the standard library extensively so you can get on with programming rather than how to write a linked list (although it is good to learn that, don''t get me wrong), teaches with clear realistic examples.

So, Koenig and Moo.

And the creator, Bjarne''s ''C++ Programming Language'' when you''ve already got 6 months - 1 year of hard study under your belt. It''s great but not for immediate beginners.

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As suggested above, i would stay away from H. Schildts books.
I borrowed a few of his books on C++, and they do encourage some strange habits, that even i( as in me not being an expert could spot.

Not to encourage a crime or anything, but the Stroustrup book is available in PDF format alot of places. You might want to take a look at it from that source, or better yet in a bookstore featuring a chair and table That way you can if its the kind of book you are looking for before you buy it (and with that book you wont have to worry about the information being inaccurate

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quote:
Original post by Ziphnor
...they do encourage some strange habits.

Such as? (honestly interested )


pan narrans | My Website | Study + Hard Work + Loud Profanity = Good Code

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