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danger_boy_13

Good c++ ref book

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What would be a good C++ reference book? I have a good basis in both C and C++ ( I am a computer science major with both classes under my belt) and I have C++ Primer Plus 3rd edition along with Deitel and Deitel''s C How To Program. Any reccomendations on what would be another good reference book (not a Learn to Program book) to add to my collection? I have heard that The C++ Programming Language and Accelerated C++ are both good, but is there any definitive book?

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The "C++ Programming Language" (even if it is the most poorly written technical book in the universe)

Also consider "The C++ Standard Library" by Josuttis, which is an excellent reference for the STL.




ai-junkie.com

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quote:
Original post by fup
The "C++ Programming Language" (even if it is the most poorly written technical book in the universe)

I''m curious - in what way is it poorly written? I''m reading it at the moment, and have no objections to it. Of course, I have the third edition, and I have heard that it is a vast improvement on its predecessors; nevertheless I am curious.

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"I''m curious - in what way is it poorly written?"

I have the latest edition too. I also have the first edition. They are equally poorly written and organised. The best thing about the book are the pretty yellow and blue ribbons you can use as page markers.

In a well thought out reference book, if you want to know about X, you look in the index, go to the page, find the sub heading X, and read and learn about X. In Stroustrups book, X may or may not be in the index. If it is, the page it refers you to almost certainly will not have a subtitle X. X is probably referred to without comment in a single line of code that is there to explain A and B. So you have to find out where he actually refers to it in text. That is usually a matter of much flicking through the pages and cursing.

Many of his examples are not free standing. So you have to go back and read unecessary amounts of irrelevant code before you are in a position to understand the topic you are looking up.

I could go on, but I''m sure I''ll get flamed for these few comments. I don''t mind, everyone has their own opinion. Mine is that Bjarne''s book is the worst technical book I''ve ever read (by an order of magnitude), and I have a lot of technical books. It hurts me that I have to own a copy.

I accept however that many readers like his style. There''s no accounting for taste, but hey, we''re only human.

The Josuttis book on the other hand is a masterpiece of technical writing. Although sadly, you don''t get any ribbons. (Take heed Addison Wesley!)

Right, I better go and don my asbestos catsuit...




ai-junkie.com

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Huh, I''ve never had this problem. In fact, I have found more and more that when I have a question about C++, the Special Edition is the absolutely best place to get an answer.

I have had problems with the index, but that''s common to most technical books. When I''m looking for something like how to write a function pointer to a class method, it takes a couple tries to find it (classes? function pointers? pointers?).

So, I usually look in the index for X1, figure out I should look at X2, find the page, read it, look at the examples, and my problem is solved.

Rarely, I will go off and read other sections referenced, but usually that''s because I''ve gotten interested in the topic, and want to learn more.

I agree with you about the ribbons.

Anyone who is serious about C++ should have this book. Might I suggest that fup sell his copy very cheaply to danger_boy_13, and everyone will be happy.

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Ah, I see what you mean. I agree that Stroustrup''s book is not a good reference, though it''s packed full of interesting technical information; at some point I do intend to purchase an actual reference book to complement it.

Sadly, I don''t have any ribbons, since I didn''t have the money to get a hardcover edition.

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So basically, Fup, you are saying that The C++ Programming Language is written poorly but it is still more or less a necessity? I was kind of confused cuz you were going from one side to the other.

Also, The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis is a good book? By itself or in conjunction with Bjorne''s book? I had heard about Josuttis, too, I am just trying to find a really good ref book to add to my growing library.

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