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MicroJackson

Any still using Software Renderer?

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I''m not joking, few months earlier the RadGameTools site announced the "Pixomatic" http://www.radgametools.com/pixomain.htm Adn there''s another called FastGraph http://www.fastgraph.com It''s kinda weird, now a computer without 3D hardware accleration is very rare, every Windows PC installs DirectX, and your GFX card driver usualy installs OpenGL Driver for you... I tried FastGraph, but it isn''t as fast as I thought, even much slower than my crappy 3D Card, and the PixOmatic cause a random crash, do you recommend using it to develop games?

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Yea, and slooooow... remember: the great thing about 3D-acceleration, is that you let the gfx do all the graphics related stuff, and then you have tons of CPU-cycles for the rest. A 500Mhz running hw-graphics, is rather supercilious to a 1.5GHz running software.

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1) Desktop PCs without 3D acceleration these days are, as you say, very rare, and have been for about 5 years (even a Matrox Mystique from 1997 has some acceleration - sure it can''t do non-stippled alpha blending etc, but does SOME).

2) However... You''re forgetting laptops - while all NEW laptop graphics chips do have 3D acceleration, some laptops manufactured as recently as 2001 don''t have any 3D acceleration.

3) Some old chips were SLOOOOW and buggy even back then - developer relations staff from one IHV suggested that software rasterisation would be better and perform faster than trying to work around some of their hardware bugs!

4) If anyone is mad enough to have an old card in a new (desktop) machine, then software rasterisation is usually fast enough.

--
Simon O''Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com

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I don''t know about you guys, but heck, I loved raptor, and prince of persia and other nifty software rendered games. I''m sick of lots of polys while no gameplay.


---
novocaine thru yer veinz

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quote:
Original post by benishor
I don''t know about you guys, but heck, I loved raptor, and prince of persia and other nifty software rendered games. I''m sick of lots of polys while no gameplay.


Aside from the point. 2D is pretty easy with GL and D3D. And it''s far, far faster than you could ever hope to approach with software. Quite literally the difference between 200fps and 1200fps in a tile engine I''ve written.

Software does give you free reign over the pixels, though. (google for a 64kb demo by the title of heaven7. It''s shiny, and would be extremely difficult to do with current hardware)

I''m hip because I say "M$" instead of "MS".

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For 2D, a common PC is pretty enough, even in Standard Windows GDI, my PII 450 can afford at least 30 fps in 640*480 without a bit accleration.

What I''ve concerned is the 3D part, not mentioning the way of using fake sprites like DOOM, but display a REAL polygon (3DS/OBJ...) in your screen.

Without those new fancy things like "Pixel Shading", "Bump Mapping", "Realtime Lighting"......., it''s entirely possible to make a "3D" game in software, but might not looking so pretty...eh?

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You have forgotten some real life examples...

The Sims uses some 3D graphics (the characters) but no 3D acceleration.

Sim City 4 has a Software Renderer, but can(and should) use 3D Hardware.

Then there''s Homeworld... OpenGL/Direct3D/Software, switching on-the-fly. Much like Half-Life, if I remember correctly. But Homeworld could even switch Hardware/Software mode during the game.

About free games, there was Parsec, but its software renderer has fallen behind in funcionality, and they decided to drop it. Recently, they''ve even dropped the whole project, and are making it Open-Source.

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