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rtr1129

Win32 vs. Linux Development

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In another post, someone said that Linux is easier to program in because you don''t have all of the Windows overhead crap that every game programmer hates doing (device contexts, messaging, etc...). I don''t know very much about NT or Win2000. Is there any chance that since Linux is generally considered to be a more stable OS that the Windows line will eventually evolve into an OS like Linux that is easier to program in? Also, is it even worth bothering attempting to develop games for Linux? Do they run smoother or is there any advantage there? Thanks.

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do i think Windows will develop into something like Linux?
no. it would require a complete rewrite of almost all APIs in Win32 (DirectX, WinSock, Win32 API etc), i think it''s out of question.

but there is a point in developing for Linux... at least if you use OpenGL like i do, and program ANSI C.
i find it much more stable, with better documentation and better compilators and all that. it speeds up the development process, at least for me.

and don''t forget that it''s free, too.

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Linux is not a multimedia friendly... I buy a new HW, i install (if allowed) in linux (the HW have the drivers for win, but not for linux). So i search for a compatible drivers.. The drivers found is not use the HW to full percent or with a many bugs.
So, ready to programming.... opengl (graphics) ok (but it''s same of win), sound(stardard, not a 3d of other caps.), joystick (stardard, not force feedback and more), net (of course, unix)... movie (avi, mpg, mov... not as easy!), price in market (estimated $0 for many apps./games for Linux, so what''s is the bussiness??), design 3d (3dstudio???), design 2d (Corel Linux, stop counting), design sound (stardard, or translate sound from win), database and another data manager (stardard "fopen"), install stuff (??). Programming code (Ansi C, better of VC++?? = NOPE!!, not a object code), Programming share code (5+ years of many free code of VC++ (for windows).






-eng3d-

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Maybe eng3D can clarify himself a little more . . . (he) makes sentences (incomplete) uses (a )(lot) of ()''s. Is he trying to list something? (What is his primary language? Still trying to figure out his pseudo-English.)

He mentions ANSI C, but fails to say anything about C++, which Linux uses also.

Strangely enough, he doesn''t mention GTK or other ways to program for X Windows.

Hopefully, installation will become easier as Linux settles on a standard; .rpm files are popular and easy to use. Other programs will install themselves with three simple commands. (configure, make, make install) Nothing too dificult there, except that you have to make sure your system''s drivers and stuff are up-to-date (which you have to do with Windows also).

Maybe he should open himself to stuff oher than HW (whatever that is - I am guessing that''s the standard way to program Windows, correct me if I''m wrong), I think there are better ways to program. I''ve seen the "Hello World" program that comes with VC++. It''s as ugly as hell. Thanx, But I''ll stick with ANSI C++.

I guess it''s easier to learn Linux first, rather than trying to learn it after working with Windows for a while. I hear that a lot of Windows stuff is propriety, which means Microsoft doesn''t care a whole lot about portability. It''s too bad that a lot of programmers ignore people that don''t use Windows. Usually, porting from Linux to Windows is much easier than trying to go the other way around.

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Don''t forget, Linux is a commie OS. If you have any pride for our capatilist freedom, you will program for not-linux.

Note: this post does not contradict my signature.

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I agree, if an OS has an economic system, then Linux would be a Commie, Windows a Capitolist, and Apple would be everything else (just trying any way to make SOMETHING)

What is a man without goals? A dead man.

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Yes, and if windows were a human being it would die of a heart attack every day, sleep all day, and have the mental capacity of a 2 year old.

Linux however would die only when circumstances are really bad, be a productive, average person.

Just another way of looking at things.

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You''ll have to explain this "Linux is a commie" thing to me. It seems that Windows controls the people and the market (I wonder which gov''t fits that?), and Linux allows anybody to make changes (Hmmmm . . . seems closer to the teachings of a democracy to me . . . )

I really don''t get how anybody can compare Linux to Communism. Explain!

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Simple political science, Cobra. Linux is a communist OS because you are expected to:

1. "sell" your game for free.
2. release the source code to the public

Doesn''t sound like a place I''d like to be.

Just remember, MAC and Linux are viable game OS''s. *smirk*

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"expected" isn''t the same thing as "forced." And I never said that I agree with all of the movements related to Linux. And I still don''t see how they relate to communism.

Programming is my hobby as well as (hopefully) my future career. What I''m mainly interested in is the idea of being able to have a project that can be worked on by many programmers for fun. When I program for a business, though, I''ll follow company policy, and expect pay. And in order to get paid, they''ll probably put a price on the program. I don''t have a problem with that. I don''t think the Linux community wants to get rid of prices altogether. Then again, it depends on who you talk to. I think some are more radical than others, but nobody''s forcing you to use GPL or to copyleft your programs!

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