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SonicSilcion

Designers' dilema

2 posts in this topic

Okay, how many people here have read a post that starts like this: "I have an INCREADIBLE idea for a game. I''ve got it all laid out. All I need now are programmers, 3D artists, musicians..." Immediately thereafter it declines in to a bunch of "I don''t believe you" and "cool! can you be more specific?" posts. I think the problem here is that there are no specifics up front. I''m not expecting entire designs to be posted on-line, but saying that posting what you have fleshed out can only help. Instead of jumping right to the MsgBrd with a great new idea, we should spend some time actually planning out what is needed of the development team, not just what jobs need filling. That way when we do post for help, you can ask everyone exactly what you want/need for the project. This will not only cut down on the time wasted asking questions, but will allow people right from the start figure out if they are qualified for the project, saving some grief and frustration.
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Very, very good point. I would also add that a developer should at a minimum have a web site with a brief overview of the project. Also bring something else to the table besides a great idea.

Glen
Dynamic Adventures Inc.
http://www.zenfar.com
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Ok, first off. Most of these, "I have a great idea" posts, turn into those flame wars simply for the fact of a post''s attitude. Many of these first posts can be translated into something like this:

"Hear ye, Hear ye. I am God''s gift to the gaming industry. I have the most orginal idea in the world and it is a (insert name of famous game here) clone. I demand that you programmers, artists, and musicians bow down before me and pay me homage. I want all of you to do all the work for me, and if I don''t like it I''ll throw it in your face. I am not very serious about this, so I will lose interest in about 2 weeks, which doesn''t mean you guys may stop working for me, instead you must make things I like and so I can get all the credit and prance around at the next E3"

Yeah maybe a bit exagerrated, but not much. If you want some advice...yeah sure have it all laid out, but not rigid. If you want ppl to help you out for free, you gotta expect that they want to add their own creativity to this project as well. And for heaven''s sake if you are making a future commercial title, do not post your design doc somewhere! Put it all under NDA as soon as you can...and have a lawyer write it up for you.
As long as you''re a good teamplayer, and are prepared to become a good mediator for big disputes inside your team, then you should be fine leading a small team. Oh and did I mention keeping a balance between being in control or being a control freak?
Don''t worry my friend. You''ll do fine.
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