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Drevay

So happy! :D

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Yep, I''m ever so happy, finishing the grade 11 QuickBASIC manual today, and will be moving onto Microsoft VBASIC, this is great. Considering I thought I could never learn programming, now that I''ve got the general idea of modular programming and variables, I think I''m even ready to move on to C, or C++. By the way, don''t laugh when I ask this (please >.>), but, can you program and compile C programs in a C++ compiler, such as Bloodshed Dev C++ 4.0...? I have always wondered that :C Oh, and when I tried to upgrade to Dev C++ 4.01, it seems that I always mess it up somehow, and errors occur saying files are missing and such, maybe I should just replace the .ini...or maybe I should just replace the .exe? I''m..not sure..any help? Oh, and, should I start with C, then go to C++,.....sorry for all of the newbie questions...I''m usually pretty quiet about things like this...but...I just need some good advice is all Well, later :D Of course that''''s just my opinion, I could be wrong. -)(-Dennis Miller-)(-

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Oooooh. No!!! Don''t start with C. See the post "Transition from c to c++ , difficulty."

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You don''t need to start with C at all.

Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo is a good book if you can afford it.

Or make this online book your friend. Work through it bit by bit. Don''t treat it as bad information because it''s not a bound book. Read it like you mean it. Work through the links on the left of its page.

Or both.

All the best with your studies.

Pete

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Despite whatever difficulty you might have transitioning- just in case the game programmer thing doesn't work out knowing standard C is good, especially if you have to do any programming in UNIX environments (since they generally don't like/don't use C++, at least in my experience). That's not to say that you shouldn't learn C++ (since it's used in many different areas), but I think a good foundation in C is very useful.

And even if the programmer thing does work out, there are plenty of cases where you would use C and not C++, for example on the Game Boy Advance (I know this first-hand...C++ is possible but is not generally used).


-------------------
"Pointer?????"
-Anonymous

-=Xelius=-

[edited by - xelius on March 3, 2003 11:38:38 AM]

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Most C programs can be compiled on a C++ compiler, with a few exceptions.

Dev-C++ 5 beta is getting pretty good. You should give it a try.

C will be less of a learning curve, and most of what you learn can be applied to C++, but it is a little harder to make stupid mistakes in C++ with it's stricter type checking, enums instead of defines, and templates instead of macros, and you can declare variables just about anywhere rather than the start of functions and globaly. Classes and polymorphism is pretty neat and can save you alot of work, too. If you want to move on to graphics later, I hear DirectX is a pain in C, although OpenGL looks exactly the same. I'd personally recommend C++, but you can start with C if you prefer, it isn't a huge deal.

[edited by - smart_idiot on March 3, 2003 11:41:49 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I say it again: C ruins the way you are thinking. It really keeps you from understanding the paradigms of C++. If you want/must code in C, learn it after C++.

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quote:
Original post by Xelius
Despite whatever difficulty you might have transitioning- just in case the game programmer thing doesn''t work out knowing standard C is good, especially if you have to do any programming in UNIX environments (since they generally don''t like/don''t use C++, at least in my experience). That''s not to say that you shouldn''t learn C++ (since it''s used in many different areas), but I think a good foundation in C is very useful.

And even if the programmer thing does work out, there are plenty of cases where you would use C and not C++, for example on the Game Boy Advance (I know this first-hand...C++ is possible but is not generally used).




I agree. And the thing is: if you go for C, you''ll just have to learn the language; but if you go for C++ you''ll have to learn the language *and* the object-oriented stuff, which is good but i think it''s too much for a newbie.

Victor.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I say it again: C ruins the way you are thinking. It really keeps you from understanding the paradigms of C++. If you want/must code in C, learn it after C++.


I learned C before C++ and it didn''t ruin my way of thinking. Now i''m an OO-lover, i hardly can code non-OO, but still i think C is a good start point, because it''s easier.

Victor.

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CallMeNeo8Ball: er... that's actually quite offensive and totally unnecessary. You sound like you were brought up in the McCarthy era. Have you ever been to China or have any Chinese friends?

I know you're just a kid joking around but you make me feel unwelcome and I just thought I'd let you know.

[edited by - petewood on March 4, 2003 4:41:16 AM]

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Going from C -> C++ isnt bad at all, I learnt C at my college and I spent about 2 months 25 hours a week at school learning it, now I am teaching myself C++ and its easy. There isnt that much to the C language compared the C++ which is alot. Also it depends how you like to program. If you think in objects then learn C++ so you can do that right away or you can think in structured code then learn C. Any language you learn will be easy to pick up, but C is less to learn. You will end up learning both languages withen a year anyway to just pick what one you will be more happy with.

If you do C first, then you dont need to learn the struct part of C++, so you can skip a lot of any C++ book, its just a few minor syntax changes. Then you learn objects and the other goodies that come with OOP. If you learn C then you will have less trouble reading code from other people like for linux or open source stuff, a lot of that is in C.

In short pick the language you think you would rather program in, and overall you should learn both languages faster then if you picked one that you didnt want to program for.

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Hmmm... Great advice, since I am eventually getting Linux, I will deiffinately go with C, thanks :D

And to the guy who said the unecessary comments about Chinese Communism, man, that was very offensive. >:C I mean, I have a few friends who are Chinese American, so please, enough.



Of course that''''s just my opinion, I could be wrong.
-)(-Dennis Miller-)(-

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