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steg

Math in Graphics rendering / engines

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Hi guys, I''ve always struggled with the math side of gfx rendering etc...My coding skills are pretty good, I''ve been doing C++ for around 8 years now and work as a senior software engineer, but have always ''messed'' about with games coding from an early age. To cut a long story short, when I see all the math involved with coding a 3d game it always makes me feel like I''m not good enough to do a 3d game engine as I don''t understand all this math. Is it possible to code a 3d game with not much math knowledge ? Thanks in advance, Steve PS - I do try and learn more math but struggle with it.

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quote:
Is it possible to code a 3d game with not much math knowledge ?


No, unless you just build maps for an existing game.

There are a couple of books out there that deal with the "3d mathematics" part pretty good, though.

It IS heave - I did some 3d stuff 15 years ago, and now, cominb back for a hobby, I must say - well - I have a hard time, too.



Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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Yes, it is definately possible to make a 3D game with not much more than a bit of trigonometry, a small understanding of what matrices and vectors _represent_ (not necessarily how they work) and finally a decent maths library (e.g. D3DX) written by someone who does understand the maths...

...HOWEVER: you''ll never have a true understanding of what you''re really doing until you understand a little more of the maths. The truly great optimisations come from that knowledge, as does the ability to invent new things. Also there''ll be a moment when most things will "click" when the relationship between say trig and vector products is clear etc.

Realistically about A-level standard is all you need, with a few extra specialist topics relevent to graphics.

--
Simon O''Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Try SOSMath.com.

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quote:
Original post by steg
Hi guys,

I''ve always struggled with the math side of gfx rendering etc...My coding skills are pretty good, I''ve been doing C++ for around 8 years now and work as a senior software engineer, but have always ''messed'' about with games coding from an early age. To cut a long story short, when I see all the math involved with coding a 3d game it always makes me feel like I''m not good enough to do a 3d game engine as I don''t understand all this math. Is it possible to code a 3d game with not much math knowledge ?

Thanks in advance,

Steve

PS - I do try and learn more math but struggle with it.


If you''re good enough for C++, then you''re good enough for math!

The math required for 3D games is not the toughest on the planet. Maybe it''s not that you''re not a good mathematician, you just lack the confidence.

Sorry to sound like an auntie. :D

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Hm, well - for the pure 3d rendeing part, yes, but for things like collision detection and physics - a LOT of otherwise seldom used math IS a requirement.

It is hard - not impossible, just a different world.


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)

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Thanks Guys for your comments, I much appreciate them.

I guess a lot of the math can be self taught ? I mean, most of my programming career has been self taught, I did do a degree in computing but we didn''t do too much math and they only taught us C.

Anyway, I''m going to do some math study, back to the begining with it, better to walk b4 running so to speak!

Thanks again,
Steve

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Contrary to "popular" belief, you hardly need any math knowledge at all.

Here''s all the major math stuff in my Software Engineering major from OIT, and whether I''ve used the concept in game programming:

Derivatives -- don''t need ''em
Integrals -- don''t need ''em
Vectors -- need them the most, and need to know all the tricks.
Matrices -- just need to know simple things about them.
Differential Equations -- not at ALL.

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quote:
Original post by thona
Hm, well - for the pure 3d rendeing part, yes, but for things like collision detection and physics - a LOT of otherwise seldom used math IS a requirement.

It is hard - not impossible, just a different world.


Regards

Thomas Tomiczek
THONA Consulting Ltd.
(Microsoft MVP C#/.NET)


Alot of things like collision detection and physics you can bluff. For instance I performed successful collision detection only using the Pythagorian Theorem (c^2 = a^2 + b^2) on boundeing spheres. I''m sure in not the only one to find this shortcut, amoung others. Game programming is not just being about a math nut, it''s about find easy and efficient ways of pulling off great effects.

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Well, I also have a mental block when it comes down to math, but I am getting there, I guess you just have to bash at it and read as much game math books, resources etc...

It bugs me when people understand the weirdest math stuff, like, how the hell do they understand that etc...

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