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Programs like TrueSpace etc can add and subtract arbitary polygonal hulls, leaving no holes or other artifacts. How do they avoid expensive brute-force line and plane intersection algorithms? ******** A Problem Worthy of Attack Proves It''s Worth by Fighting Back

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Using a BSP it''s very easy deciding whats inside/outside. This isn''t something i''ve looked into a whole lot, but i know that''s the basic idea You might want to check the closed Fountain of Knowledge-column on www.flipcode.com, i believe there were a few interesting questions about it there.

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MFC is sorta like the swedish police... It''''s full of crap, and nothing can communicate with anything else.

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Is it possible to simply use rendering tricks (via the stencil buffer) to make the image look as though it''s been CSG''d without actually doing it?

I saw an example of this on the OpenGL site with just a sphere and a cone,but presumably it can be extended to more primatives?

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Well, i guess, as long as you don''t have any overlap between the objects... The problem is that the stencilbuffer is 2D, so i would definitely not go for that technique...

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MFC is sorta like the swedish police... It''''s full of crap, and nothing can communicate with anything else.

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Well, it would probably be to create a bsp-tree for each object, and using that to find what faces intersects, then slice away the faces depending on what operation you''re using.

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MFC is sorta like the swedish police... It''''s full of crap, and nothing can communicate with anything else.

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