Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Euler

This topic is 5372 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Need help ending a debate. Is Euler pronounced "oiler", or "uuler"?? -DD EDIT- (Forgot about websters.com) Eu·ler ( P ) Pronunciation Key (oilr), Leonhard. 1707-1783. Swiss mathematician noted both for his work in analysis and algebra, including complex numbers and logarithms, and his introduction of much of the basic notation in mathematics [edited by - agentidd on March 24, 2003 9:14:49 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since it''s German, eu is always oy, so oiler is correct As for those Japanise guys that had the idea that helped solve fermat''s last theorem, anyone know that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It''s ''oiler''.

Enough people pronounce it ''uuler'' (incorrectly) that they can convince each other they''re right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, it''s oiler. I''ve never actually heard anyone pronounce it otherwise, except for when I first pronounced it years ago, and was promptly corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We all speak diffrent languages.
For instance, in sweden the money in USA is called ''dollar'' and spelled ''dollar'', but we do not pronounce it as you americans.

Pronounce it as it would be pronounced in your country.


I am a signature virus. Please add me to your signature so that I may multiply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

Pronounce it as it would be pronounced in your country.



I agree with pronouncing things as you''re used to. But it really peeves me when people change the name of something to fit their language.

Like I''ve seen Spanish people call New York "Nueva York". IT''S NOT NUEVA YORK. It''s New York.

Do English speaking people call Oscar de la Hoya "Oscar of the Hole"? No!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Americans have bastardised half of the English language !

Actually, the English spoken in America is more similar to the English spoken in England in the time of Shakespeare than the modern "Queen's English", in terms of pronunciation, anyway.

This is because the current accent was added in the mid 1700s (or maybe early, I don't remember exactly) because English nobility thought that English didn't sound as nice as the romance languages. The current British accent was their attempt at making it sound higher-class.

Meanwhile, in the colonies, people continued speaking the way they always had, especially following the French and Indian War, when anti-British sentiment began to grow, and the colonists wanted less and less to do with mother England.

However, when it comes to some spellings, we probably did bastardize it

quote:
It peeves an american that people change the name of something to fit their language ?? LOL. Americans have bastardised half of the English language !

Italian name: Venezia (vehy-nehy-tz-ee-ah)
English name: Venice

Italian name: Firenze (fee-ren-tzay)
English name: Florence

Italian name: Sicilia (see-chee-lee-ah)
English name: Sicily

Granted, these are mostly minor, but my point is, we do the same thing.


[edited by - CmndrM on March 29, 2003 1:33:08 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I pronounce it phonetically as You-ler, like it rhymes with Ruler. And yes I live in the US so that explains it.

~~A drunk mans'''' words are a sober mans'''' thoughts~~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

Like I've seen Spanish people call New York "Nueva York". IT'S NOT NUEVA YORK. It's New York.



What's your point? Every language does this (even yours). Ciudad de Mexico Muenchen, Goeteborg, Roma, Warszawa, Koebenhavn, Praha, the list goes on and on

*edit* stupid Mozilla.

[edited by - Muzzafarath on March 29, 2003 5:00:14 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Enselic
Pronounce it as it would be pronounced in your country.


I am a signature virus. Please add me to your signature so that I may multiply.


In some ways I agree, but with someone''s name I think you should pronounce it the way it''s pronounced in the person''s country. So "oiler" it is.

Although I guess I''m somewhat of a hypocrit. I don''t even pronounce my name correctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Agentidd
Need help ending a debate.

Is Euler pronounced "oiler", or "uuler"??

-DD

EDIT- (Forgot about websters.com)

Eu·ler ( P ) Pronunciation Key (oilr), Leonhard. 1707-1783.

Swiss mathematician noted both for his work in analysis and algebra, including complex numbers and logarithms, and his introduction of much of the basic notation in mathematics

[edited by - agentidd on March 24, 2003 9:14:49 PM]


I am from Austria - Swiss is not far away. Euler is called oiler in German, so that''s the way it would call him in English - at least all my math professors at university called him like that :-)

Hope I could help you,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites