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Dynamics question

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In my 2d space shooter, I have objects, each of them have mass, and I also have engines, which have thrusting power. The problem is: How to limit the maximum speed of an object in space. Should I use the relativity theory to limit the speed to some defined lightspeed in game or should I add some kind of artificial friction. Or should I just set speed limit? I wish to have physics engine as realistic as possible, but without loosing the smooth gameplay. If you have some equation which has given good results I'd be very interested. Vikke Matikainen [edited by - kosmo on March 26, 2003 5:34:32 AM]

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Heh!

Of course, fuel will do the job

Why not to use relativity, also? You see - only with fuel you won''t be able to limit velocity - you''ll limit only the time you''re able to use your engines and that''s all so you need something else to limit the velocity. In reality the only thing that does it (in FREE space) - ralativity theory

C++ RULEZ!!!

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It''s just a game; relativity is overkill, and more than just that, it''s misapplied here. Just add artificial drag.

Fdrag = (-k/|vobject|2)vobject

Set k to taste, higher for more drag and a lower terminal velocity.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
TerranFury:

I just replied to your thread "ballistic...", and observs that you havent forgot the drag.
But your model of drag force is in scalar tems (in the direction of motion) equal to

Fd = -k/v

which seems to me bizarre. A lower drag at higher speeds?

I''d say

Fd = -k*v


/Ola

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TerranFury''s drag equation isn''t physically consistent. AP''s drag model, which is linearly related to negative velocity, is good for low velocity. Fd = -k*v2 is valid for somewhat high velocities, but is more costly to compute.

Graham Rhodes
Senior Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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