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NashuNatta

Some Good Books

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I was looking through some of the books on C++ and was wondering what is a good book for an absolute beginer that is fairly cheap (like in the 15-30 dollar range) that will let me get fairly good at C++. I would also like to know what other books I should look at/be interested in if I am going to program in C++ and whether or not I should just look for tutorials online instead of wasting money on books. Thanks in advance

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Im sure you''ll receive other replies but IMHO don''t hold your breath looking for a good book in that price range. Looking at the books on my shelf that would pertain to you, you''re most likely looking at $40+, averaging around 50. I''ve always felt that a good book is better than an online tutorial ultimately, though that''s not to say I don''t utilize all of the resources at my disposal. Especially if you just want to toy around with something like DirectX or OpenGL without throwing down $60 simply to satiate curiosity.

With that said, the books I started with (in school) were honestly horrible so I''ll leave others to recommending such.

As for online recs I know of:
(nm...realized similar post HERE.

Go there for some links.


[edited by - ChildOfKordova on October 11, 2017 10:32:23 AM]
weird

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The absolute BEST book for beginners, in my honest opinion, would have to be

Learning How To Program in C++ by Steven Heller

Although it starts off a bit slow, 95% of the information in the book he teaches you is valuable. In addition to that, he doesn''t attempt to teach you everything in C++. Rather, he teaches you a firm and resolute ground work that will truely help you along the way. Also, throughout the book he is "teaching" a beginner just like yourself how to program. She asks many of the questions I ask - but can become quite annoying for the semi-literate programmers out there.

In any case, if you *don''t* like lots of explaining, then I''d recommend one of those Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days. <-- Only recommended for those you can learn languages by interpretting through translation (e.g. Mi Nombre es Diablo translates to My name is Diablo - if you can learn a language like that then go for it).

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I think that Deitel & Deitel''s "C++ How to Program" is the best beginner-intermediate book on programming in C++. It''s about $70-80, but well worth it.

(silencer)

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I agree on Ivor Horton''s "Beginning Visual C++ 6" - another one I own and use. It''s good for learning visual C++, but I''d go for Deitel & Deitel''s "C++ How to Program" for learning the language since it''s MUCH more detailed.

(silencer)

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Deitel and Deitel''s books are very much like textbooks without the requirement of a professor. The book explains everything. If you want to learn a language and learn it completely I''d highly recommend any of their books.

The problem with using tutorials to learn any language is that you must be able to adapt to various author styles and that''s simply not something that is easily done when you''re learning something from scratch. If you''ve already got a firm handle on programming in general online tutorials will often help you out, but not, IMHO, otherwise.

$30 to $40 isn''t much; if you can find a way make it $50 the number of opportunities you have for an excellent book open themselves up. $49.95 is a common computer book price.

Good luck to you.

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Ok, I got this book from a friend of mine. I am not sure if it is good, because as I read through it, it is different from what I am used to seeing being codded as C++. The book is Sams Teach Yourself C++ third edition in 24 hours. I am using Microsoft Visual Studio 6.0 that my school let me borrow. In the book, for the hello world tutorial it is just different from what I am used to seeing. Instead of typing cout<<"Hello world"; it makes you type std::cout<<"hello world." I was just wondering if there is a big difference between compilers or if it even matters and which one is more universal. Thanks Again

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The version without std:: will have ''using namespace std;'' somewhere. That means, ''automagically put std:: in front of things like cout if it''s required.'' The second version doesn''t have the compiler take such liberties.

''std'' is a namespace - a group of functions and data known by a common name (a bit like a class, in a way). This particular namespace, though, is the one for all the parts of the C++ Standard Template Library, of which cout (and cin) are members.

Superpig
- saving pigs from untimely fates, and when he''s not doing that, runs The Binary Refinery.

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