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masonium

book for shader programming: ShaderX or Real Time

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I already know Direct3D and the *very* basics of shader programming. I need a book that contains lots of special effects and tips for programming vertex/pixel shaders. I have a Radeon 9000 Pro, so I can use any shader version before 2.0. Anyway, I''m leaning more towards Real-time rendering tricks and techniques, because ShaderX has mixed reviews. But, I don''t need/want the Win32/basic D3D introduction that comes with basically *all* premier press Game dev. series books. So which do you think is the better buy?

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I have Real Time Rendering Tricks and Techniques with DirectX by Kelly Dempski...and personally I do believe it is a good introduction to shader programming, but it doesnt go into as great a depth as ShaderX probably will. I have not read ShaderX but I have read Wolfgang''s articles here on GameDev and they went into more depth about why stuff works the certain way and the math as well.

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We have ShaderX at work. Many of the examples start refering to inputs that they haven''t said what they are (Reflection and refraction ones). They''re based on some earlier shaders, so look you figure, maybe he tells us what those inputs are in the previous shader. Nope.

It all seemed like a rush hack job to put together a book on a new topic. It''s not a tutorial of any sort. It''s a series of examples that, as noted above, don''t tell you what all their inputs are.

I found the book to be more frustrating than useful.

Between here, the examples nVidia gives, and the samples in the nVidia effects browser (not the CG one, though you could go the CG route if you wanted), you''ll learn most effects. Once you''re comfortable with the code, you can start doing your own thing limited only by what you can think of.

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