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inoam

Which C++ compiler to use?

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I apologize if this question was answered many times already, but the search is broke (At least for me). So which Compiler should I use? I thought Visual C++ would be the best for me, but in book I'm reading (Thinking in C++) it says I will problems with VC. I don't mind paying for one, which one is the best for a beginner like me? [edited by - inoam on April 18, 2003 2:18:14 PM]

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Visual C++ is an excellent compiler, but there is a larger learning curve compared to other compilers.

[edited by - Magriep on April 18, 2003 2:32:49 PM]

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A few are Borland C++, DJGPP, and Dev C++. If you want to find more info on these search google. I''ve only used Visual C++, so I don''t know how easy it is to use I only know that it takes a while to learn Visual C++.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
There''s a difference between the ''compiler'' you use, and the ''development environment'' you use.

Your development environment can be Notepad. It doesn''t come with a compiler, or much syntax help.
Your development environment could be VC++ or GCC, they both come with compilers.

You can code with either of the abbove, and compile your files with Intels compiler.

A compiler does just that, takes source files and compiles them, it doesn''t edit, you don''t type in it, it can usually be ran from a command line statement.

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Dev-C++ is a free IDE for dos command line compilers (for windows) and comes with mingw. VC++ doesn''t have hardly any learning curve IMO, particularly compared with command line compilers. You hardly need to know anything to use the debugger, it''s entirely within the GUI.

-~-The Cow of Darkness-~-

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
There''s a difference between the ''compiler'' you use, and the ''development environment'' you use.

Your development environment can be Notepad. It doesn''t come with a compiler, or much syntax help.
Your development environment could be VC++ or GCC, they both come with compilers.

You can code with either of the abbove, and compile your files with Intels compiler.

A compiler does just that, takes source files and compiles them, it doesn''t edit, you don''t type in it, it can usually be ran from a command line statement.



GCC is just a compiler, not and IDE. C++ .NET has free downloadable command line compilers, but visual studio/C++ is an IDE.

-~-The Cow of Darkness-~-

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Since you own VC++, the other complier you should own is Dev-C++
It should run your Thinking in C++ code.
And its free.

VC isn''t the best, but somehow it became the de-facto standard. Dev-C++ is slowly becoming more popular, and currently at my university, programs are split about

60% VC++
35% Dev-C++
5% Borland.

As for a beginner, I still recommend VC, since it is the de-facto standard, so most tutorials are written to use it.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Which is the other 10 %

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I''m a bit curious because I''ve only used Microsoft Compilers and IDEs, but what makes Dev-C++ so good? Would you consider it better than Microsoft''s new Visual Studio .NET 2003 for C++ development?

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