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GLUT.....good or bad?

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I was just wondering if anyone knew what the advantages or disadvantages are of using GLUT. I am new to Opengl programming, and i want to know if using raw opengl code...like here at Nehe''s tuts, is better, or should i use GLUT? Any help would be appreciated Thanx If you smoke after sex, youre doing it too fast

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GLUT is good and bad...

Pros:
Very very easy to understand, and hence good for beginners.
Cross platform...

Cons:
Old, outdated and not maintained anymore.

My advice is don''t use it!

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I adore GLUT. I mainly had to use it as my university demanded it, but it''s nice and simple and lets you get to work OpenGL quickly. It''s also cross-platform as mentioned, and since I keep having to port my code from Windows to Linux all the time it''s ideal.

But in this day and age a lot of people don''t seem to like using it. With a lot of people liking to make Visualisation code as far removed from the main code as possible (for easy conversion), GLUT''s not so great.

I can''t find any online tutorials that use GLUT heavily. It''s all Windows API stuff. I''m considering doing some simple GLUT/OpenGL tutorials myself when I''m a bit more adept (to help other uni students doing my course next year), but that''s going to be a few months down the line.

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GLUT is good for getting simple graphics apps up and running fast, especially accross multiple operating systems and is well suited for acedemic environments (I used it in school to code on NT and run on Solaris), but it is not a full featured game solution (audio, etc), so you might want to use SDL instead (if cross platform is what you are after).

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I use GLUT almost all the time. It''s great if you want to get things up and running quickly without much effort.

Another thing to consider: I made programs that can be compiled both in Windows and Linux without changing a single line!!!

But if you prefer to call some windows API with a *lot* of dark and misterious parameters, go ahead, choice is yours...

Other thing to mention: there is a simple library that implements basic controls and user itnerface based on GLUT library. It is called GLUI and a simple search at google can reveal it. Try it!




"Steel and Fire,
Spreading the Holy Word,
Dirty Liars,
The truth has never been told" - Primal Fear

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I use GLUT almost all the time. It''s great if you want to get things up and running quickly without much effort.

Another thing to consider: I made programs that can be compiled both in Windows and Linux without changing a single line!!!

But if you prefer to call some windows API with a *lot* of dark and misterious parameters, go ahead, choice is yours...

Other thing to mention: there is a simple library that implements basic controls and user itnerface based on GLUT library. It is called GLUI and a simple search at google can reveal it. Try it!




"Steel and Fire,
Spreading the Holy Word,
Dirty Liars,
The truth has never been told" - Primal Fear

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It really boils down to what you want to use OpenGL for, and just how far you want to go with it. GLUT is deceptively easy, so it seems a quick way to achieve what you want, but in the long term it will only slow you down. The limitations of GLUT will quickly become apparent, and more and more restrictive as you try and do increasingly complex things. The Win32 API is of course infinately more flexable, but learning it takes more work. It really depends if you want to go to the effort. If you intend to use OpenGL into the future however, you will have to move away from GLUT sooner or later, and it will seem a much easier transition if you do it earlier rather than later.

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Thanx alot you guys.
I''m planning on using Opengl very intensely, and i wouldnt want any limitations, so ill stay away from GLUT

Its better to learn everything the right way anyway!!!

Thanx

If you smoke after sex, youre doing it too fast

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quote:
Original post by Nemesis2k2
It really boils down to what you want to use OpenGL for, and just how far you want to go with it. GLUT is deceptively easy, so it seems a quick way to achieve what you want, but in the long term it will only slow you down. The limitations of GLUT will quickly become apparent, and more and more restrictive as you try and do increasingly complex things. The Win32 API is of course infinately more flexable, but learning it takes more work. It really depends if you want to go to the effort. If you intend to use OpenGL into the future however, you will have to move away from GLUT sooner or later, and it will seem a much easier transition if you do it earlier rather than later.




So what you tell me about portability? Does I have to do I huge code for Windows, huge code for Linux, huge code for Solaris, etc?

I agree with you in the terms that if you want to do a more complex program like a game or something like that, Windows code *must* be used instead of GLUT, but for academix purpose, personal purpose and even demo (is some cases) I think GLUT is not bad...

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