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tuxx

Vintage Programming?

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With the current state of computers, a lot of stuff goes to waste. There is no need to program in assembly anymore, unless you are doing some low-level hacking or are trying to squeeze the most speed out of a slow loop in a game. Memory is going to waste. And it''s only going to get worse with better and better hardware. I was thinking that it would be a fun challenge to program for a vintage computer, such as a Commodore 64, an Atari 2600, or an Amiga (I could probably get a couple free Apple ][s from my local school). I remember hearing about a group of programmers writing games and demos for the Commodore 64 a while back. Have any of you done this? If so, would you recommend it? I think that it would be a good experience, and I bet it would be a lot of fun. Has anyone done this or is anyone currently doing this? If so, would you recommend it (i.e. is it fun, do you learn a lot, etc.)? Which vintage computer type would you say is the best to program for (i.e. Amigas, Commodore 64s, etc.)? Thanks.

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I looked into Atari 2600 programming for a few weeks, but I didn''t like it much, it''s all very very slow with tiny amounts of memory and has to be in 100% asm. I liked programming VGA stuff that was a ASM-C mix.. but I''m not a big fan of writing entire programs in pure ASM.

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I programmed Z80 asm for my TI-83+ for a while. That was really fun; having such serious hardware restrictions adds an interesting challenging element to programming.

Hell, I even like to program in TI-BASIC, because you really have to think out your algorithms to get any speed. Making an amazingly fast radical-simplifier in TI-BASIC is quite fun.

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I saw a few stuff in EDGE about programmers releasing new games for old systems like the spectrum, vectrex etc... Which you can buy online and they send to you shrink wrapped in original packaging and cartridge.

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Take a look at www.pouet.net . It''s full of demo''s, games etc for all kinds of platforms, including commodore....

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If you enjoy living in a trunk on half a cup of water and exactly 40 grains of rice (unboiled!) look into Java games for cellphones (J2ME).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
AH...been along time since I''ve programmed on the C64 or Amiga..the good old days...

C64 - very easy to pick up the assembly (6502 CPU), but very limited in graphics and sound...even thought so back then.
Even has BASIC built into the ROM..so you could start there. I remember using a program called Merlin to program assembly..don''t know how it''s done today...after all these years..I still remember some of it
LDA #32
LDX #0
LOOP:
STA $400,x
STA $500,x
STA $600,x
STA $700,x
INX
BNE LOOP
RTS

Amiga - The hardest part will be learning how to program the hardware (Copper Lists,Blitter etc..), but I still like the 68000 CPU...I even still have an Amiga 4000 in the back, just needs a mouse.


C64 - Simple, Limited...
Amiga - A challenge, but lots of fun...

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!? the amigas not vintage. I still think its better at multi tasking and graphics than the PC ever will be! I''d recommend you write a c64 game, cuz i think that''s probably the coolest. Ahh the old days when everygam i played had "Cracked BY ???" bouncing over the borderless screeen!!!
btw I wrote an amiga game looong time ago it''s on any aminet site or cd (Linetrix, a Minter style shooter with a phat soundtrack yo)

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3 letters:

GBA.

http://www.gamedev.net/reference/articles/article1628.asp
http://www.gbadev.org

You dont even need a GBA, you can run everything through an emulator on your PC.

Also, ARM > x86

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