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J-Mac

Is There a Definite C++ Book?

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J-Mac    122
Heya, I''m sure this has been asked more times than anyone should possibly care to mention, but is there a book that''s considered the ''definite'' learning material for C++? At the moment, my skill is limited to basic control structures, etc., and I would like to increase that knowledge to things such as memory management. What book teaches things such as these in a formal, perhaps even easy, way? Also, at what point should I start into DX/OpenGL? Again, I realize this question has probably been asked more times than atoms I have in my body, but if anyone would care to elaborate, be appreciated. Thanks, J-Mac

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Sneftel    1788
There's no definitive learning material. Universities are quite fond of Deitel & Deitel, but remember that that is in conjunction with a guided programme of study. I learned off of Herbert Schildt, then found out later that that was a bad way to learn. A lot of people like the "C++ in 21 days" book, but don't expect to complete it in 21 days. Overall, as long as you have a half-decent book, what really matters is that you pace yourself, taking plenty of time to explore the language on your own. Do all the exercises. Write all the sample programs it tells you to.

EDIT: oh, and to your other question. Start OGL/DirectX when you feel comfortable with the fundamentals of the language (hint: if you're unsure about pointers, you aren't ready yet). The two do occasionally test you on advanced C/C++ features, but more importantly, you should have a handle on good program design and be able to implement it easy before you heap an API on your plate.

How appropriate. You fight like a cow.

[edited by - sneftel on April 29, 2003 3:39:09 AM]

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IPKnightly    101
These books should be formal enough seeing that the guy who actually invented the C++ language wrote the seconded one.

4. The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference
by Nicolai M. Josuttis
Average Customer Rating: 5
List Price: $57.99
Buy new: $57.99

ISBN: 0201379260

(HAVE)5. The C++ Programming Language (Special 3rd Edition)
by Bjarne Stroustrup
Average Customer Rating: 4
List Price: $64.99
Buy new: $64.99

ISBN: 0201700735

DIRECTXMEN

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bastard2k5    238
quote:
Original post by DIRECTXMEN
These books should be formal enough seeing that the guy who actually invented the C++ language wrote the seconded one.

4. The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference
by Nicolai M. Josuttis
Average Customer Rating: 5
List Price: $57.99
Buy new: $57.99

ISBN: 0201379260

(HAVE)5. The C++ Programming Language (Special 3rd Edition)
by Bjarne Stroustrup
Average Customer Rating: 4
List Price: $64.99
Buy new: $64.99

ISBN: 0201700735

DIRECTXMEN

Well, I would agree that these books are definitive, but I wouldn''t consider Stroustrup''s book one to read if you are new to the language. It is kinda intense to read, and is best suited if you have programmed in C++ for a while.

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rypyr    252
I agree. Stroustroup''s book is not aimed at newbie''s and is not structured well for learning the language from the ground up.

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NewbieGamer    122
I am not being sarcastic...... Just wanted to share an opinion expressed by the author of C++, Bjarne Stroustrup
http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq.html#best-book

There are several other interesting questions and answers in that page.....http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq.html

Cheers!!!
V!

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Arild Fines    968
quote:
Original post by NewbieGamer
I am not being sarcastic...... Just wanted to share an opinion expressed by the author of C++, Bjarne Stroustrup
http://www.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq.html#best-book


Surprise surprise... he is recommending his own books...



"To assert that the earth revolves around the sun is as erroneous as to claim that Jesus was not born of a virgin."
-- Cardinal Bellarmine

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NewbieGamer    122
Sure, he does...... but i think he does not stop there...
He also provides another link http://www.accu.org/ in that same answer that when navigated in certain clicks yields...
[Beginners]
http://www.accu.org/bookreviews/public/reviews/0hr/beginner_s_c__.htm
[Advanced]
http://www.accu.org/bookreviews/public/reviews/0hr/advanced_c__.htm

and various other material...

HTH,


Cheers!!!
V!

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Komodo_Dragon    122
I learned from Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days. It is the best book for people just starting out IMO. If you already know some of the language, you will get through the book in no time. You will be more than ready for DX or OpenGL if you finish this book (OpenGL is easier than DX IF you know the 3d concepts, but you have to learn them first). However, I would concentrate on finishing whatever C++ book you are going to read before you start anything. Stroustrup''s book isn''t a good introduction for newbs.

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IPKnightly    101
quote:
Original post by rypyr
I agree. Stroustroup''s book is not aimed at newbie''s and is not structured well for learning the language from the ground up.


That is what this book is for.


(HAVE)3. C++ Primer Plus (4th Edition)
by Stephen Prata
Average Customer Rating: 4.5
List Price: $49.99
Buy new: $49.99

ISBN: 0672322234

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Xai    1848
I completely agree with DirectXMan about his first two books ... the Stroustoup and Josuttis books are THE two books I use on a regular basic at work to get my job done (although I am getting to the point where I only need the Stroustroup book when double checking an esoteric language detail, it served me very well from over 2 years).

I disagree with anyone who says the stroustroup book is not good to learn from ... it is a GREAT book to learn C++ from ... IF AND ONLY IF you are comming at it from a very academic (computer science) level ... where you want to actually learn the language and ideal in detail .. and progress through various levels of programming knowledge. If you want to develop applications with C++ quickly, without the groundwork ... then it is not a good book. It is an especially good book if you are in a situation where you have no formal training, and no-one to gain it from ... this way you are learning the language from the same perspective as taking a college course, instead of as a hobby. If you already have that knowledge, or don''t want it ... there are much better books.

And a fairly new book for C++ newbies is "Accelerated C++", which I haven''t read myself, but my coworked used when going from C to C++, and he said it was a great book to guide you thorugh things ... look up it''s TOC online and see if you want it ... cause the authors are really good. Koenig is one of the top 3 C++ article writers around ...

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IPKnightly    101
quote:
Original post by Xai
I completely agree with DirectXMan about his first two books ... the Stroustoup and Josuttis books are THE two books I use on a regular basic at work to get my job done (although I am getting to the point where I only need the Stroustroup book when double checking an esoteric language detail, it served me very well from over 2 years).

I disagree with anyone who says the stroustroup book is not good to learn from ... it is a GREAT book to learn C++ from ... IF AND ONLY IF you are comming at it from a very academic (computer science) level ... where you want to actually learn the language and ideal in detail .. and progress through various levels of programming knowledge. If you want to develop applications with C++ quickly, without the groundwork ... then it is not a good book. It is an especially good book if you are in a situation where you have no formal training, and no-one to gain it from ... this way you are learning the language from the same perspective as taking a college course, instead of as a hobby. If you already have that knowledge, or don't want it ... there are much better books.

And a fairly new book for C++ newbies is "Accelerated C++", which I haven't read myself, but my coworked used when going from C to C++, and he said it was a great book to guide you thorugh things ... look up it's TOC online and see if you want it ... cause the authors are really good. Koenig is one of the top 3 C++ article writers around ...



That's ah hem DIRECTXMEN but thanks.




Any Key



[edited by - DIRECTXMEN on April 30, 2003 1:18:33 AM]

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bastard2k5    238
I only disagree on the level, I wouldn''t start people off with the book.I am currently still learning the basics of the language more or less, coming over from Java. I am currently reading Accelerated C++, very good book, gives nice examples, Stroustrup''s book has a lot of information, but a lot of it doesn''t really make sense to a newbie C++ programmer. This is my 3rd attempt learning C++, once on my own, next in a lower division CS class, and now as an upper-division elective. so I can make some sense out of Stroustrup''s book, I would probably equate the info as to that of the UNIX man pages, it is the best source for all of the information you need, just not in a newbie friendly format.

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Caroline_M    181
I''ve also worked through the whole of Accelerated C++ but I wouldn''t recommend it to a complete beginner. I used it to brush up on my C++ skills after a 3 year break from programming. It can be a little fast paced in places.

On the other hand, it is relatively short. A book such as C++ Primer, while it is excellent, can be a bit daunting due to it''s size.

Caroline M.

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zer0wolf    1022
if you haven''t the faintest clue about programming any programming book will be daunting at first, but I purchased Accelerated C++ a few months ago and it helped me more with C++ that two college semsters of it did. Its a great book that while isn''t very long, its very, very constructive with the words and code it has in it. I''d highly recommend it.

I personally detest programming books that tell why something works and even how it works, but not how its actually applied. Accelerated C++ has you putting together constructive programs very quickly.

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Yann L    1802
quote:

Well, I would agree that these books are definitive, but I wouldn''t consider Stroustrup''s book one to read if you are new to the language. It is kinda intense to read, and is best suited if you have programmed in C++ for a while.


I don''t really agree with that. I learned C++ from the ground up using Stroustrup''s book (although it was the second edition back then). I didn''t encounter any major problems, it was good to learn the language directly from its creator, presented in a more academic style. Although I already had a heavy C background at that time, but that might or might not have been a good thing.

Anyway, did someone mention Bruce Eckel''s "Thinking in C++" ? It might not be the absolute best C++ book, but it''s pretty good, and it''s free.

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