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Digigamer15

Question about the demand for Programmers

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I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work? ----------------------------- AIM: Trebor DoD Hompage: www.riding-free.net/gamers_airspace/

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If your only criterion for choosing a profession is being assured of hireability, I suggest Electrical Engineering. A competent chip designer will never go hungry


How appropriate. You fight like a cow.

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quote:
Original post by Digigamer15
I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work?

-----------------------------
AIM: Trebor DoD
Hompage: www.riding-free.net/gamers_airspace/


Look around you: Look at how many stuff needs to be programmed. Computers are everywhere nowadays, and they need programmers to write the software.

Individual fields related to computer science is another matter though, some are a lot more competitive then others but I don''t think finding a job will be too hard if you''re not picky.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Just a little correction, EE''s have gone way out of demand and CS''s have taken over their jobs. There is still plenty of demand for a programmers in the world. computers, cell phones, guidance systems, cars, microwaves, etc, etc. So many things have a computer on board and almost all of those computer''s need to be programmed beyond what some EE hard coded in it. If your only goal is to code video games, that is a competitive field. If you''re open to other options, there is plenty of work for you. I graduate in May from WPI as a CS major, and i have 2 job offers on the table right now.

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The industry is only suffering if you compare it to how it was during the dot-com boom. In 1999, if you could spell ASP, some lame startup would unwisely promise to make you a millionaire. Those offers don''t happen anymore, but talented programmers can still find work.

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I''d have to imagine jobs for programmers will increase in the coming years. EVERYTHING is going to need to be programmed! Hell, I saw a refirgerator at a computer store (Well lots of stuff actually... it''s called Fry''s) and it had A BUILT IN WEB TERMINAL. What the heck? As useless as I think it is (not to mention, such a gimmick) someone had to program it. It''s only going to increase, IMO. Job market is poor right now, I hear, but in 6 years (after I get my master''s, hopefully) I''m counting on the market to pick up

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It all depends how passionate you are. If you are in it because you love tech, because you want to be a part of something big, then by all means, you will always find a place.

Talented people who are flexible, whose self worth hasn''t been over inflated, who are willing to move around if needed, will probably always be in demand.

If you are in it for the money, then the job will tear you up and spit you out. You will become bitter and jaded.

If you want to become a game programmer and if you want a safety net in case you decided maybe it isn''t for you (for one of the many reasons it doesn''t fit some people) then get a CS degree. If you start taking classes and aren''t interested in them or if you aren''t programming on your own time for fun, then you might want to reconsider.

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quote:
Original post by Digigamer15
I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work?



I think if you have a passion for programming then you will always find a plethora of opportunities. I also think if you just join CS for the $$$ (like the majority of CS college graduates) then you may likely find yourself lacking an employer.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Just a little correction, EE''s have gone way out of demand and CS''s have taken over their jobs. There is still plenty of demand for a programmers in the world. computers, cell phones, guidance systems, cars, microwaves, etc, etc. So many things have a computer on board and almost all of those computer''s need to be programmed beyond what some EE hard coded in it. If your only goal is to code video games, that is a competitive field. If you''re open to other options, there is plenty of work for you. I graduate in May from WPI as a CS major, and i have 2 job offers on the table right now.


Reeeally. So, there''s lots of computers, hmm? lots of cell phones? lots of guidance systems? lots of cars? lots of microwaves? All with computers in them? gee, that doesn''t sound much like EEs going out of fashion. It sounds a bit more like "more demand than ever".


How appropriate. You fight like a cow.

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Computer Engineering, a hybrid EE of CS is where I see the most demand in this area. We hired two new people last week.

If you like to program, and are any good at it, you can make good money doing something you enjoy. I would not avoid it because of some out-of-work .com bust people. Unemployment is very high right now, compared to the last twenty odd years, there will be people out of work in all fields. There has been a very low demand for mechanical engineers here lately; in Detroit, Auto-City USA. (It is picking up now, but was disconcerting for some time).

Find out if Digipen is an accredited university or a tech school. It looks like they actually offer CS degrees now, not RT simulation certification. If they are accredited, then the only reason not to go there is the cost.


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I agree that you should not worry about unemployment as a programmer. Software developers are as employable as most other professions and you should not have a problem.

I also agree that it's helps a lot if you enjoy programming. People tend to be better at things they enjoy.

[edited by - JimH on April 30, 2003 4:07:13 PM]

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Am I the only here who got confused by people questioning about jobs in Computer Science?

Is it the job that makes you major in Computer Science?


Current project: A puzzle game.
% completed: ~0%
Status: Active.

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quote:

Reeeally. So, there''s lots of computers, hmm? lots of cell phones? lots of guidance systems? lots of cars? lots of microwaves? All with computers in them? gee, that doesn''t sound much like EEs going out of fashion. It sounds a bit more like "more demand than ever".


The trend in the computer industry is to use the exact same chip in several different applications and just program it differently. Software is much more versatile than hardware. Therefore, the programmers are pickup a lot of work while the EEs are losing out. This is not opinion.

Perfect example: Take general dynamics, a defense contractor. In the 80''s, the work force was divided about 20% programmers 80% EEs. Currently, it''s the reverse.

One of the reasons: Every military communication system must implement several different types of cryptographic protocols, such as RSA and elliptic curve. If one of the systems is cracked, every communication must instantly be able to switch to a different system. While it''s possible to implement both systems in the hardware, we''ve found that it is easier to have a single chip capable of doing both and implement the systems in the software. The slight operational speed loss is not significant given the greatly shortened development time.

Another example: Video cards are only as fast as their drivers. Think of all the cards that weren''t all that great when the first hit the market, but once an updated version of the drivers came out, they were blazing. I''m not certain of the SE/EE breakdown at nvidia, but i''d bet they are mostly software engineers. The drivers often have a bigger impact than the hardware itself. It makes sense, business wise, to have more people working on the drivers than the chip. A faster implementation of openGL speeds up all the chips, not just a single model.

Having just graduated, i know very few CS majors in my class looking for work and i know very few EE majors who have a job.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
It''s another installment of Hollywood Morality to believe if you really want something and if you really try you will really really get it (just like "The needs of the many outweight the needs of the few"... uhu...). Nobody can promise you anything in life so I won''t bulls**t you about how "you can be a leet codar, too". All I''m saying is you won''t be happy at all in your life if you don''t do what you want to do, regardless of if it succeeds or not.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
here''s a quick and dirty do-it-yourself career guidance tip:

go to the monster.com "search jobs" page,
type in some keywords that make sense for the specific career path you''re interested in,
choose one or more locations in which you''d be interested in living/working,
pick one or more job categories pertaining to the specific career path you''re interested in,
get results.

try this for several different job types, language types, locations, etc. continue to do this over the months/years, refining your search criteria as you learn more about what you''re specifically interested in pursuing as a career. see how the job listings grow/shrink.

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I reckon someone''ll develop a huge neural net that programs computers and designs chips and stuff automatically - then we''ll all be f--ked!

George. F
"Who says computer games affect kids, imagine if PacMan affected us as kids, we''d all sit around in a darkened room munching pills and listening to repetitive music....uh oh!"

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quote:
Original post by GEo
I reckon someone''ll develop a huge neural net that programs computers and designs chips and stuff automatically - then we''ll all be f--ked!



Ah, I''m sure there will still be plenty of jobs serving the machines, polishing them, and doing their bidding.

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