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Digigamer15

Question about the demand for Programmers

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I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work? ----------------------------- AIM: Trebor DoD Hompage: www.riding-free.net/gamers_airspace/

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If your only criterion for choosing a profession is being assured of hireability, I suggest Electrical Engineering. A competent chip designer will never go hungry


How appropriate. You fight like a cow.

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hireability should not be an aspect in choosing a profession becuz if you are so worried about money you will not have fun !

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Well, im really looking to be a game programmer or if not that then a software enginner.

-----------------------------
AIM: Trebor DoD
Hompage: www.riding-free.net/gamers_airspace/

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quote:
Original post by Digigamer15
I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work?

-----------------------------
AIM: Trebor DoD
Hompage: www.riding-free.net/gamers_airspace/


Look around you: Look at how many stuff needs to be programmed. Computers are everywhere nowadays, and they need programmers to write the software.

Individual fields related to computer science is another matter though, some are a lot more competitive then others but I don''t think finding a job will be too hard if you''re not picky.

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Just a little correction, EE''s have gone way out of demand and CS''s have taken over their jobs. There is still plenty of demand for a programmers in the world. computers, cell phones, guidance systems, cars, microwaves, etc, etc. So many things have a computer on board and almost all of those computer''s need to be programmed beyond what some EE hard coded in it. If your only goal is to code video games, that is a competitive field. If you''re open to other options, there is plenty of work for you. I graduate in May from WPI as a CS major, and i have 2 job offers on the table right now.

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The industry is only suffering if you compare it to how it was during the dot-com boom. In 1999, if you could spell ASP, some lame startup would unwisely promise to make you a millionaire. Those offers don''t happen anymore, but talented programmers can still find work.

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I''d have to imagine jobs for programmers will increase in the coming years. EVERYTHING is going to need to be programmed! Hell, I saw a refirgerator at a computer store (Well lots of stuff actually... it''s called Fry''s) and it had A BUILT IN WEB TERMINAL. What the heck? As useless as I think it is (not to mention, such a gimmick) someone had to program it. It''s only going to increase, IMO. Job market is poor right now, I hear, but in 6 years (after I get my master''s, hopefully) I''m counting on the market to pick up

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It all depends how passionate you are. If you are in it because you love tech, because you want to be a part of something big, then by all means, you will always find a place.

Talented people who are flexible, whose self worth hasn''t been over inflated, who are willing to move around if needed, will probably always be in demand.

If you are in it for the money, then the job will tear you up and spit you out. You will become bitter and jaded.

If you want to become a game programmer and if you want a safety net in case you decided maybe it isn''t for you (for one of the many reasons it doesn''t fit some people) then get a CS degree. If you start taking classes and aren''t interested in them or if you aren''t programming on your own time for fun, then you might want to reconsider.

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quote:
Original post by Digigamer15
I am currently 15 and my goal is to attend Digipen Institute of Technology and enter the programming field. My parents are against this however and recently my dad read an article (I think it was in the wall street journal) about how so many programmers are unimployed in the Bay Area. I was wondering if this is really how it is and if I go into the programming profession will I really have a hard time finding work?



I think if you have a passion for programming then you will always find a plethora of opportunities. I also think if you just join CS for the $$$ (like the majority of CS college graduates) then you may likely find yourself lacking an employer.

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