Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

hexman

What if........................

This topic is 5533 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

What if you *really* want to get into a certain field of work (Programming, Graphics, Design, etc.), but, like me, you don''t have the money to continue on to your 3rd and 4th years of college? I can only afford to get an AA Degree right now and I have several ideas to pursue but each one has a huge roadblock: 1. I would like to be a programmer, but I can''t, because I have very poor math skills. 2. I would like to be a modeler/animator, but i can''t, because 99% of the places I wanted to work for only accept people with Bachelor''s Degrees. 3. I would like to be a Journalist for a magazine that covers either Games or Movies, but I can''t, because (1) there are no good magazines that cover movies, and (2) I''m starting to fall behind in the world of games. I haven''t been playing them as much as I used to, but i''m trying! Any ideas? Thanks in advance. See what i''m getting at? My question is, how could one, such as myself, overcome on these *big* obstacles and pursue a career? Hexman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
*sighs*



TRY READING THE FIRST TWO CAREER PATHS I MENTIONED!!!! THEY *DO* RELATE TO GAME DEV, DON''T THEY???????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are many people successful in the industry who were/are college drop-outs. But, unfortunately, they already were masters at what they did/do.



- Rob Loach
Current Project: Upgrade to .NET and DirectX 9

"Do or do not. There is no try."
- Yoda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by hexman
My question is, how could one, such as myself, overcome on these *big* obstacles and pursue a career?


I don't have a degree, but knew from the age of about 9 (seriously!) that I wanted to work as a programmer in the games industry - 20 years later and I am...


For a company employing someone, that person having a degree shows a few things:

- that the candidate is intelligent

- that the candidate has covered certain basic topics in their field

- that the candidate can work hard

- that the candidate can be given an advanced task/project and be able to do their own research etc


In the games industry, the following are as important as a degree, and at some companies much more important:

- Enthusiasm for the job, games and the industry - someone who dreads going into work and doesn't enjoy the job isn't going to do very well when they have to work 18 hour days at crunch times

- Talent/Knowledge - for an art job for example you could present diplomas and certificates showing you've done courses in 3DSMax etc - but they wouldn't mean very much. Doing an amazing sketch using a cheap pen on a piece of paper while waiting in the reception area for an interview shows MUCH more than any qualification does...

- Commercial Work Experience - if you've worked on published games, then you are much more employable. However, having worked at ANY company producing software IS worthwhile, particularly if that software is sold at retail.

- General Work Experience - what do you do with your spare time? If you want to be a games programmer - then PROGRAM, learn as much as you can, try things out, make demos, make games, make utilities, get GOOD as a programmer. Likewise with an artist, draw, paint, sculpt, etc (don't fall into the trap of believing that you can only be a 3D artist if you have experience of the major packages - their interfaces are evolving to try and emulate things like sculpting, and the most important skill is an artistic eye [in the same way that being able to use MS Word doesn't make you an author]).

- A demo/portfolio which shows you're competent in what you say you are.

- Ability to work in a team. Work on one of the many projects in the "Help Wanted" section here. Work on a mod. Do a team sport etc.


Now look over the above points, including what a degree gets you (you'll notice some overlap). ALL of those can be achieved for little or NO money [I grew up on a poor housing estate in an unemployed single parent family etc - you CAN overcome any obstacle - just be ambitious and keep FIGHTING blah blah blah...].

How do you improve your maths skills? - by writing programs in your spare time which make use of maths. By going to a public library and borrowing beginners and intermediate books about maths.

Professional journalists usually have higher qualifications in English. Most aren't so specialist, they work on many different magazines and then end up at one which specialise in things they're interested in - a good writer is what's important. How do YOU get some experience which might be of interest to a magazine? - a few ideas:
* get a job as an office junior at a magazine or newspaper publisher
* get a job as an office junior at a PR company
* look at the free newspapers in your area, write articles for them and see if they publish any
* if you're still at school/college it's likely there is a school newsletter and/or newspaper - find out who's behind it and ask them if you can join
* write _opinionated_ letters to magazines and see how many get published
* start your own magazine, maybe locally, maybe on a website


The world is never as rigid as it seems - I know it feels that way when you're younger, it certainly felt that way when I way 16-17 and couldn't afford to do a degree and all doors seemed closed. Do a degree later if you want (I'm 29 and considering a part time degree now...).

If you've got TALENT, then apply for those jobs which say you need a degree, what have you got to lose?, the price of a postage stamp and maybe a portfolio/demo CD?...

There's a saying which, in time, you'll see the wisdom of:
YOU make YOUR own chances in life

--
Simon O'Connor
Creative Asylum Ltd
www.creative-asylum.com

[edited by - s1ca on April 30, 2003 7:26:22 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do not give up on programming if you really want to do it. Math can be ambigious but keep practicing. Search google for math tutorials sites. I remember when I first start Win 32 programming, it was like greek to me. Now after continuous practicing the burden is no more. As for college try and get a scholarship or just take one or two classes. Maybe even try to get an intern, even if you do not get paid, the experience is priceless. Hard work will pay off, not over night though. Nothing beats a failure but a try! Good luck!


-----------------------------
"There are ones that say they can and there are those who actually do."

"...u can not learn programming in a class, you have to learn it on your own."



[edited by - cMADsc on April 30, 2003 7:55:08 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by hexman
*sighs*



TRY READING THE FIRST TWO CAREER PATHS I MENTIONED!!!! THEY *DO* RELATE TO GAME DEV, DON''T THEY???????


Errr... If your looking for people to help you out, thats probably not the best way to go about it.

Pretty In Pink

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Futhermore, try getting a job at a local school, they are always needing people to repair pcs or install something. Or try subsituting teaching during the day and taking night classes.


-----------------------------
"There are ones that say they can and there are those who actually do."

"...u can not learn programming in a class, you have to learn it on your own."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey there,

If you are that poor, getting student aid in the form of grants (preferably) or student loans is trivial. I wouldn''t give up on school if you have done well in community college since you are already half way there.

-stilltjack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

Participate in the game development conversation and more when you create an account on GameDev.net!

Sign me up!