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bioagentX

Programming Plan

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I have a plan for learning game programming, and some feedback or suggestions would be helpful from anyone willing to take the time out of their life to answer. I have three books that I''m trying to learn programming and game programming from. These books are "Teach yourself game programming in 24 hours(Which is suprisingly good regardless of the advertising gimmick), Absolute Beginner''s guide to C, C++ for dummies, C++ the complete reference, and A guide to programming in C++". Now, I want to start making cool games and I am trying to learn how to do it in the quickest and most efficient way possible, while still enjoying the process along the way. One book I have, which is at www.lvp.com "A guide to programming in C++" has tons of example problems. I like doing the example problems, because they help me utilize what I''ve learned, however, I am wondering if I should do all of them. Being that many of them take a while to make, I think because I wanna mainly focus on game programming that I should just do some of the problems, but not all. Do you feel that my plan will be effective? I mean, how did you guys learn C++? Did you just learn what books taught you, or did you go out of your way to work through example programs that you really aren''t interested in programming? Any feedback would be much appreciated. --BioagentX

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Take a look at this.
They are discussing this in another thread.
My suggestion learn C++. Go through all the examples and make sure you learn everything in the book. Pay special attention to: pointers, structs, classes, references (&), and... i think that''s it.

Then go to the game programming books, but once you have a solid footing/understanding of C++.

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Actually, I was aware of that thread but my question differs. I wanna know whether or not going through EVERY single example is worth it. I go through all the review problems in each chapter, but at the end their are excercise chapters that take a long time. And I feel that I understand the material enough, but lack the confidence to tell my self to move on. I am wondering whether or not this lack of confidence is there for good reason, or whether I am exaggerationg. Plus, should I read an entire reference book, would that be worth it? Or would that just take too long and downsize my game making/learning efficiency?

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depends on what the examples are. seriously though, make sure that all your books are in the same paradigm. If they''re not you''ll have to convert the non OO to OO, since you seem to be using C++. Or you can do both. Its really important to distinguish between the different paradigms of programming though, specifically for design and organization.

Only do the problems in the book that make you think, and do all of the problems that involve ADTs, those will come in handy later.

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quote:
Original post by bioagentX
These books are "Teach yourself game programming in 24 hours(Which is suprisingly good regardless of the advertising gimmick)


Yeah that book is good, I also use it now.
I'm just going through the book right now, and through all the examples, to gain some main knowlegde of C++. I also got a book about object orientated programming in C++ and a book "OpenGL Game Programming" so I won't be bored for a while
Not every example is interesting, but I think you can't know enough, maybe you'll need it someday.







[edited by - Marjolein on May 4, 2003 12:45:35 PM]

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OOP in C++ by Robert Lafore
About half way through it... It''s really good so far.



- Rob Loach
Current Project: Go Through Object-Oriented Programming in C++ by Robert Lafore

"Do or do not. There is no try."
- Yoda

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