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Niphty

The hardest part of game design..

23 posts in this topic

Ok, here''s a sorta quick poll for everyone: what do you consider to be the hardest part about designing a game? I personally lack patience, I want it all done now, right now if not yesterday Half the time I''m drained from working on things, so I play with ideas in my head. They never really collude very well, so I end up bouncing ideas off other people in an attempt to get their thoughts, cause once I get that, I can make thoughts on their thoughts.. and start up my whole creative process But by myself I''m so disorganized it isn''t funny.. lol. So this is your chance to say what you most hate about yourself when it comes to game design, and maybe get some help/counciling on your problem (or be laughed at by the rest of us.. hehe ) J
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The thing that gets me is what to include and what not to include in your game. When you first think of a game you start putting in a ton of features and then you wonder why no one else thought of it? As soon as you start coding, then designing, and drawing the graphics you start to figure out hmmm...maybe they thought of it, but damn it''s hard to implement!

I would also say lack of knowledge. You play a game see a cool feature and say I''d like to implement that (this is about the coding side, the side I try and do) but can''t freakin figure it out. Just makes you feel dumb, like why can someone else do it but not me, am I just stupid?



-----------------------------
00000010 - My 2 bits
"Smile life gets worse, and then you die!" - Optimist
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Oh, it would have to be when you know in your heart an idea is good, but nobody else can understand until you literally draw it out in front of them. Dammit! That''s what the artist is for!

=)

This post was brought to you by the letter "Land", and the number "Fish!"
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I often fool myself into believing I have a complete design in my head, when in reality all I have is a general idea and a lot of assumptions. It feels complete, but it's not. And therein lies the difficulty of designing a game. There's a lot of little details to be sketched out, and by specifying those details the idea matures into something more concrete. By adding, ammending and removing little details you contribute to the whole of the game. When designing a new game it's a good idea to work in a way that promotes this kind of flexibility.

For instance, I recently attempted to write a formal design document for the game I'm working on. It seemed to work at first, but I later noticed that "formal" does not go well with "initial design". So I bought a little sketchbook and am using this to jot down whatever little details I can think of. Once I'm done with this I plan to use it as a starting point for a formal design document.

Edited by - chronos on June 8, 2000 4:07:36 AM
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My bad flaw is after I have a great idea for a game and I write it out and I start coding it. After about 1,000 lines of code and 500 compiles with my computer constantly crashing because I leave out one simple detail like forgetting to change an integer somewhere..I start dropping the whole project..and start up the next one.. and the cycle continues... I guess that''s why I redesigned my web site about 6 times with nothing really on it =)

I found out how to organize. Get a 50-75 page notebook and keep your ideas in it... whatever pops up.. just write it out and leave it. Post-It notes work great as cheap index tabs.

People''s feedback is great, but when I try to talk to my wife about my latest programming project.. she justs nods and has the I don''t know what you are talking about stare. (DOH!).. I guess that''s why I hang around game programming message boards.



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Heh. You get it from your wife? I get it from every one around me; even the people are doing comp'' sci at uni...
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One of the trickiest parts is to make the game fun but not to complex,(or simple), and understanding how people will react to details and story. Sometimes a very small, and easy to implement, detail makes the diffrerence to whether the game is playable or not.
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Yeah I hate when I show my progress in game programming to my dad and he just says something like

'I guess that's kind of neat how that guy runs around like that. '

Meanwhile there's like thousands of lines of code and weeks of programming behind it.

Edited by - Nazrix on June 8, 2000 3:54:28 AM
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1) Patience (i want it to be great NOW, NOW, NOW!)

2) dealing with the loads and loads of ideas that come up, what to include, what not to ...

Oh yeah... and the huge amount of time that goes into a project ...
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Tell me about it Nazrix!

I showed my parents the game I have been making for months and I got the same thing. One day I am going to tell them that I am going to be doing this for a living, hah
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I''m a programmer, so the hardest part of game design, is just that, the design. I know what''s fun, but I don''t have the brilliant originality that I might need to create something new. When I do get an idea, I have blast programming it, but it may turn out to be a good programming project more so than a fun game..
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It seems that we all have the same problems.

Recording our ideas. (always have a piece of paper and a pen)
Choosing between all those marvellous ideas which to include.
Getting into details without forgetting the global design.
Being carefull not including things that will take eons to program.
Patience.
The terror of making the wrong decisionat anytime.
(And particulary for critical/big design decision)

...

I used to rely on my experience as a DM for RPG games and my experience as a player for others games.
But I talk to people loving the kind of game I design to know what they think and what they prefer.
Of course answers varies much...

Well I''m designing a new action game and have let my RPG design in the background, that way I think that next time I read my design I''ll find problems and correct them.

[random thoughts]

-* Sounds, music and story makes the difference between good and great games *-
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I have 2 difficult things:

1) Figuring out how to do those darn design docs

2) Getting beyond the design docs
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Design docs? So *that''s* why we never finish anything around here

I think the toughest part for me is that my head is already on the 4th or 5th game concept while my fingers are slapping out the details of the "now-old in my mind" 1st design. Keeping focus is rough.

Second thing is trying to guess what''ll be available from a technology standpoint by the time your design becomes reality. Nothing like busting your butt for 2 years on a game that ends up being 1 year out of date technologically on release.

-Krylar
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quote:
Original post by Whirlwind

I have 2 difficult things:

1) Figuring out how to do those darn design docs

2) Getting beyond the design docs



ROTFL....You hit the mark with #1. When I started out, I heard all the time that I''d never finish if I didn''t do the design doc first. After (too) many failures, I actually started listening. What no one ever told me was that I''d find it next to impossible get the design doc right!

You have to write it though. If I don''t have it to guide my work, I always wind up coding all the fun stuff, then stalling out on the grunt stuff. Not to mention the horror of finding out that your current codeline sucks and has to be scrapped or seriously overhauled because you didn''t see the big picture from the beginning.

(sigh)

Did I mention that I have no talent for art or sound? Thats a pretty tough item to get by. Nothing worse than watching your stick figures walk around in stick figure land...
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Unless you call the game "Stick", and market it as just that, right?



This post was brought to you by the letter "Land", and the number "Fish!"
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The only big problem is that i (and most of us) expect a lot from our game.Too much!
I think it''s just because we have used to professional games.
Maybe we should start playing again some DOS games to see the power of simplicity.
Now where did i put these floppies...
Voodoo4
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quote:
Original post by Landfish

Unless you call the game "Stick", and market it as just that, right?



This post was brought to you by the letter "Land", and the number "Fish!"


Could be problems with that though, I''m pretty sure the dev. team for Chaos Overlords (the first win95 title I ever saw)was ''StickMan Productions''. Last thing I need is a lawsuit just because my sad artwork looks like someone elses logo....

ManaSink
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The hardest thing for me is finding the time to do the coding, and using that time to code instead of playing games.

Also, as I''m making my own, unique engine, I''m finding it hard to find equations that noone else but me would ever need. I''m spending most of my time looking at graphs and pulling equations from them.

E:cb woof!
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You could hardly copyright the universal symbol of Lack of artistic talent. I think "Stick" would be a damn fun game, too!
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The hardest thing is either designing large worlds (and I mean LARGE) or writing dialogue. Ironically enough, I also have the most fun doing these things...

------------------------------
Changing the face of adventure gaming...
Atypical Interactive
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The worst bit about game designing for me is when it''s freezing cold and i''m just about to drift off to sleep and BANG! the solution to a major problem hit''s me like a brick. So i drag myself out of bed in the freezing cold, stumble down the hall way sit down a my chair and spend the next hour trying to interpret the idea correctly so i will understand it in the morning.

The next morning i wake up i instantly have a better idea than the one i had the night before.

Go on, have a good laugh at me :-)
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Yello

My biggest problem is that I lack motivation, which
drives me nuts :\ I really want to code, but when
I sit down there, or well "here" actually, and try to code
something it gets black. I think way too much, and code
way to little. I envy all of you who have those great ideas
and are ready, and have the motivation to fulfil them.
Good luck to you all.

/qbvet
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