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NeoReality

Multiplayer games and home networks!

30 posts in this topic

joeG,
Interesting target customer 8-14. I remember going to an arcade in Northampton,England when I was young. I never told my parents where I was going and I used to throw 3-5 pound a week into the machines (which is quite a lot to a 14 year old!). The place was smoke filled, and the age range of people in there where 16-30. Not the kind of place my parents would want me to be.

Now older (23) and expecting our first kid, I''d rather let my kid play on the Playstation 3 than go to a dive like that. They probally will any way. Expansion on the above comment. Id rather give my kind their own PC than their own TV in their room.

If your thinking network gaming cafe you''ll be suprised at the age range that you will get. Catering for only 8-14 year old will seriously dent the amount of posible punters.

Out of curiousity how old are you now? An advantage of owning a cafe like that is focused free time. During the day 12-4 the place will be quite allowing you to learn/program in a techie environment.

Last thoughts. How to make parents feel their kid will be safe there.
1st allow them to play too.

Make the place bright, have no dark corners.
The only problem with that in ambiance. The cafe we where planning was very William gibson cyberpunk. Very industrial, and probally not the place to bring 8-14 year olds.

Visable cameras and security

Staff Uniforms
Even a T-shirt with a printed logo. It looks more professional and safe.

Pedophiles, like all kind of sickos do not normally stand out. Dr Shipman, Englands most prolific (and extreamly resent) serial killer looked like a very nice elderly doctor. The fact is he has proven to have killed 20 and suspected of killing upto 100 people.
Visable cameras will worry them. A members only policy would also help. No need to pay but all customers details have to be registered with proof of who they are. This meens kids need to bring their parents!

NeoReality out.
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quote:
Original post by TheGoop

I think you missed the point he was trying to make: that it''s absurd to have to pay for multiple copies of the same product.



Why? When I went to see Gladiator recently, there were several of us all sat there consuming the same product. 1 person, 1 payment.

As a side point: he mentioned bringing all your mates round to watch a video. You -do- actually have to get a different license to show a group of people a video that you hire. Normal video rentals is technically only for personal use, not group use. Check the small print.

I think people like to think that because they -can- easily copy something, that it should be allowed. If you want your brother to be able to read the same book you''re reading at the same time, you buy them a copy. 2 people watching the same concert buy 2 tickets. 2 people benefitting from any single product at once nearly always means that 2 people should buy the product. And I don''t see what is wrong with that: double the entertainment, double the price.

quote:

Because they''re probably only playing part of the game (the multiplayer aspect). If they were also going to play the single player as well, than perhaps they should buy another license.



The game provides options which people can play or choose not to play. That''s like saying that someone who only reads the sports section of a newspaper or who never carries passengers in their 5-seater car is entitled to a refund. If companies wish to sell cut-down versions, then fine, if not, you buy the whole thing. You pay for the availability of features. If you choose not to use them, that''s your loss.
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quote:
Original post by NeoReality

The EULA is unlike any other contract since it does not require a signiture (is that legal??) and you can not make ammendments. CDs and videos do not have a EULA, they just say you are breaking the law copying it.


Note: following statements based mainly on UK law.

A contract does not require a signature to be binding. CDs and videos are covered by statute copyright law as well as civil damages considerations. No separate licensing agreement is necessary.

quote:
I wonder how legally binding the EULA is? All these people taken to court and imprissoned is that due to normal copyright laws or because of the EULA??


Not very binding. Most of it is legal-babble intended to intimidate people into not breaking it. They are nearly always only enforced against (a) companies with money, or (b) offenders on multi-user games who they need to kick off with good reason. These tactics work better in the USA where the winner is not guaranteed to get their legal fees paid, thus making it more likely that you''ll settle a case rather than fight it and win.

Many of the clauses in such agreements do not hold up under local laws. And in some cases, making such illegitimate claims in the agreement nullifies the entire thing (even if the contract claims that it doesn''t). Law protects the consumer from unfair contracts.
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Kylotan,
You seem to know your stuff. However the licence with videos forbids the Public display of the film (in part or whole) and the film is only to be used for private entertainment. This means I can''t project the film on the side of my house for all to see, but can show it to 2000 people in my own home if I can prove they are all friends and family.
You keep quoting watching a movie at the Cinema. I don''t know I ''drive ins'' charge per person or per car. If it is per car, then you are being charge for the space you take. Two people take two seats. Now you could argue if you go to the cinema and your mate sits on your lap he doesn''t have to pay. And if I owned a cinema I''d let them, put a member of staff next to them and make sure they only take the one seat (I doubt they could do it!).
But I think home digital entertainment should have the same licence as videos. Its private entertainment, I consider my Home PC''s as just another entertainment tool.

What else do you need; besides a miricle.
Money. Lots of Money. or I''ll never do a sequel!
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NeoReality-

I''m not really going to start one of these things up I''m young enough to still choose where I want to go in life (college) and I''ve decided that I''d rather have a game company of my own then doing something else. If I pursued something else I can envision myself looking back and kicking myself and wishing that I had actually pursued game devlopment. So there you have it.

As far as the other points you made in the last post, I agree totally. For certain there''s no surefire way to keep out bad elements. And about the target age, I''m definitely surprised. I''d figure those who have a life (24+) would bother with something else, while those with no responsibilities would hang around the cafe. Hmm, it looks like I just summed up what you said. In addition to that, owning the cafe, at least in the US where anybody can sue anyone for anything, is a a lawsuit waiting to happen.

So here''s to the success of the people already running those establishments.

joeG
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I dont see what the big deal is with making a copy of a game to play with your friends at home. Maybe its wrong but who gives a rats ass, just do it. There is a program on the internet called FakeCD, its a miricle little program, all you do is simple put in your cd, copy the cd (or the game portion) to a folder on your hard disk, then use fakecd to turn to that folder into an actual cd-rom (well, your computer thinks its an actual cd-rom drive). And its basically that simple. It should work for most games, if it doesnt,then go buy a burner for a $100, its cheaper then buying 3 games.

Now if your morals dont allow you to do that because "its wrong" then oh boo hoo, you need a fricken life and you need to grow some hair on your balls.


Possibility
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