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C Programming Compiler

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I''ve began a course involving C programming. But, I don''t want to use VS.NET because it takes way too long to compile C source code (compared to others). I like Turbo C++, due to its speed, but I kind of dislike the editor itself. Does anyone have any recommendations?
Rob Loach Current Project: Go Through Object-Oriented Programming in C++ by Robert Lafore "Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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Oh come on. Someone must know of a good C compiler...



Rob Loach
Current Project: Go Through Object-Oriented Programming in C++ by Robert Lafore

"Do or do not. There is no try."
- Yoda

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For what its worth, I think the MS compilers produce some of the fastest code.

I''ve never heard of someone complaining about compile times though. Guess there''s a first time for everything.

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On every single one of my copies of Visual C++ (from v6.0 all the way to .NET 2003), compiling straight, ANSI C source code has been blisteringly fast.

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
(I wonder what I''m supposed to say, having gone through VC++ 1.52, 4.0, 5.0 [97], 6.0 and .NET?)
I was thinking the same thing, but oh well...

quote:
Original post by antareus
I''ve never heard of someone complaining about compile times though. Guess there''s a first time for everything.

Ya, I''m only doing small programs for school in C and don''t want to worry about making all those little solutions for every single C file/program. Is there a way to bypass it?



Rob Loach
Current Project: Go Through Object-Oriented Programming in C++ by Robert Lafore

"Do or do not. There is no try."
- Yoda

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quote:
Original post by Rob Loach
Ya, I''m only doing small programs for school in C and don''t want to worry about making all those little solutions for every single C file/program. Is there a way to bypass it?
Sure. You can invoke the MS compiler (cl.exe) from the command line, or even create makefiles and invoke [N]MAKE. For single-file projects that only include standard headers, the command line is the easiest way.

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
*Gasp* All the way? From version 6.0 to version 7.0? Incredible!



(I wonder what I''m supposed to say, having gone through VC++ 1.52, 4.0, 5.0 [97], 6.0 and .NET?)


You''re supposed to tell me that I''m a worthless newb

And it''s version 7.1, foo!

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how fast do you need it to be?

anyway... if you can''t find a free c compiler using the internet I am a little worried.

Do you just need code highlighting? Use SciTE. It can run any tools you have (c compiler, makefiles, java, python etc.)

Do you want an editor and to do windows programming? DevC++ comes with the gnu compiler collection which includes C/C++, Objective C and fortran. It also includes the libraries necessary to build windows apps. On the site there is a page of free compiler links

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