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AlexM15

Sound Design

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I''ve recently become very interested in becoming some sort of sound engineer or sound designer for video games. I was wondering what kind of steps I should take to become one. I''m currently a Computer Science student, but would rather work with sound than with code. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you!

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http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1578200830/gignews/onyourmarkmus-20/002-7293507-7464850 start here.

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Getting into the industry, and pimping your name is the hardest part (or so they say).

There are always loads of audio programming positions, and the pay is better than in-house junior audio positions. Maybe that could be something you work towards in order to get your foot in the door. Once you have a couple of game credits under your belt, a couple of years experience, and a good demo reel you''ll be well ahead of most of the competition in securing an audio position.

If you had content creation and implementation skills you would be highly sought after, and be minted as a result.

Mmm, mints...

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Sounds good. Might you have some sugestions on how to get to that point however? As of now, I''m in college doing a Computer Science major and all that teaches is programing. I can''t seem to find any classes that would involve sound at all. Any suggestions as to where I should look for more info? Just because I want to be a sound designer doesn''t, unfortunetly, mean that I know how.

Thanks for all the help so far! I really appreciate it!

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Definately read Aaron Marks'' book.

There are a couple of audio programming books:

Game Audio Programming, by Mason McCuskey.
Game Audio Programming, by James Boer.

Todor Fay has a book out in October which looks at some aspects of DirectMusic programming.

I guess the way to do it is teach yourself, then get involved with a few amateur projects for experience.

Have you worked with sound at all or are you just getting interested?

There is nothing stopping anyone from claiming to be a sound designer and offering their services for hire. I guess you want to know how to get the skills to allow you to do the job?

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For three years I worked as the sound guy at a local theatre, but other than that I haven''t had much ''professional'' experience. I''ll check out those books though. Thanks.

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Alex,

I''d say you would be in better shape financially sticking with Computer Science. It would give you a broader range of employment opportunities. If you''re passionate about audio, stick in there and make it an intense hobby, with a background in computer science you would probably be more likely to get jobs in this field.

I''m just telling you what I''d do in this situation.

Take care

-Aaron

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I agree with Noct.

Stick with computer science. It will fund you in equipment and allow you to get your act together before just diving right into audio.

1) Try creating some sound effects from scratch. Read some info on the web as to how to create sounds, then use a mic and play around.

I recently made some horse galloping with a bathroom plunger on a hard cover book. Then took the sounds and cleaned them up and post processed and then voila - instant horse!

2) Start taking small jobs on this notice board for almost finished projects. Take on small games, something that has a good chance of being finished. Offer to create some sound effects for projects

The more practice you get the better. Also look at taking a sound engineering course there are quite a few colleges in the USA and UK that offer a degree in sound engineering with a focus towards film and multimedia (games).

Once you get some experience behind you and if you''re armed with a degree or diploma then that will help.

IT''s good to have a IT degree though to back you up if it takes a while to get some paying gigs for sound design.

I have done a similar thing where I''ve been working in IT for around 8 years but also picked up some music contracts for games along the way. I am at the stage now where I have moved full time into audio. I''ve been into composing for over 15 years as a hobbyist.

Good luck.

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