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mr_mrz

i just have to ask u guys...

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if you self taught yourself, how long did it take you to finish your c++ book. and in your learning process how many times did you quit? you really cant give up on this stuff if you want to leaarn it. i''ve been debugging a small peice of code for hours!!!

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I am a seat of my pants learner, starting with C in the early 90''s..

Hours? Sometimes it takes me a week to hammer out a ''simple'' function, usually due to my lack of knowledge in a certain areas which I have to research, be it the API, GDI, DX, opengl, or OOP.. then I look back to see how long it took which gets frustrating at times.. then I tell myself I learned something new which inflates my ego and I come out with full guns blazing until I get shot down by some other twerp who can do the same thing in half the code/time..

It''s all relative, no need to sweat or panic over it, when you get it you will get it. To learn C++, I am doing the ''invention is the mother of necessity'' type mentality.. code something that would be useful to me/others and introduce stuff into the code you''ve never used before.. if it doesn''t work as intended, code it the way you know, complete it and go on to the next project.. little by little you will see the light.. which is down a long dark tunnel btw..

hope that helps

I fseek, therefore I fam.

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Yea i kinda guessed that but i needed to hear it from someone experienced cause i dont really talk to many coders (yet). thanks for the reply. i definately see myself trying to invent new things with c++. when im not by my computer i usualy grab a pen and paper lately and write code to try out when i get home. makes the whole thing more exciting....

"Hello World!!!"

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I never went straight through a C++ book. I never did one program that a book asked me to do for a "quiz." I skipped through my books (usually I tried to go in order, but when I knew I needed something that was in a different chapter I''d go to that chapter). Often times I never even read the chapters all the way through - I skimmed and read the parts that looked important.

I learned from hands-on use - which is something no book can teach you. Use the code, work with it, and you will learn it. The books are reference pieces or are there to explain the underlying concept of the code but I never would think of them as THE teaching device. You are your own teaching device.

I also never quit C++. I took breaks, but I never quit.

As for debugging... yes sometimes it will take weeks to find a bug even in a small piece of code - usually for reasons that drarem mentioned.



Qui fut tout, et qui ne fut rien
Invader''s Realm

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yea now that i think about it the ay i learned was when i was writting in the book that i used my book for refference. and then thats when i actually learned what the syntax is for. thanks again

"Hello World!!!"

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I used the Turbo C++ book that came with the compiler/ide... I only read it when I couldn''t do something that I needed to, so it''s not so much of a how long did it take...

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well i stopped for like six months... and before that a year. and bofre that another year never getting past the same chapters in any boks but now i have a totaly new understanding of the whole thing and back then i couldnt find any support i''ve only recently found gamedev.net if i would have stuck to hoping someone would reply at builder.com or something i think i''d probably be in the same position. i need the community.

"Hello World!!!"

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I digested "C++ in plain English" in one hit, over the course of maybe a month, after reading (and printing out and binding) HowStuffWorks'' C tutorial. I didn''t actually learn that much by actually coding, I leaned most of it by just reading the material and absorbing it. But I don''t recommend this approach, because:

1: C++ wasn''t my first language. I''d already been working on a qbasic game for like three years.
2: I *loved* the book. I loved learning how to do stuff I couldn''t do in Qbasic. I found it really, really, really interesting.

The wierd thing is, I''ve probably done more actual coding in Java in my uni course than I did in C++ when I was learning C++, yet virtually all of my Java at uni is based on what I know about C++

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depending upon the type of reader that you are, skimming through a book, stopping only at the important points of interest is one of the best ways to learn.

i generally read the headings and scan the paragraphs and only intensely read the parts that are of interest. that way i can crush though a 1000 pages of documentation in a couple of days and have a good overview of the subject matter. the other advantage is that you now are familiar with the structure of the docs and finding something you need becomes a much easier task.

i''ve been using this technique for years. in fact, i just "read" through the entire StarOffice SDK docs last weekend and was deploying components by monday.

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