Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Killing Windows apps

This topic is 5307 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Long time ago when I still used UNIXes I remember that I have used the command ps -kill quite often. Now WinNT has this nice task manager, that becomes a disaster if a fullscreen application stops responding, especially if this application is in exclusive mode. I often need to press the little reset key. While Task Manager works perfectly for the most normal applications it is not good for killing fullscreen applications and when I make such programs (and I have lots of bugs) I am often quite frustrated. What do you do about that? Is there a way to kill fullscreen applications in WinNT gracefully? I think Windows need the console funtionality found on Linux (where one can kill and restart x if necessary)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
taskkill is available. You can use it to kill any process by name or id. The trick is in creating a script that you can run with a hotkey combo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As an example, assume you wanted a way to close foo.exe
Then create a file called killfoo.bat, and in that file place:

taskkill /im foo.exe

Now create a shortcut to killfoo.bat on your desktop.
Do a right click on the shortcut, and select properties.
Click in the Shortcut key edit field, and then just push some letter or number. Ctrl-Alt-Key will be the keycombo that will activate the shortcut.
Now when foo.exe is running, you can just press Ctrl-Alt-Key and foo.exe will close. Or rather, should close. If it fails to close, you can try adding the force option, /F , before the /im.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also I just tried this method with Quake II running fullscreen. It worked, though Quake2 reported a message about SwapBuffer failing. It did successfully terminate, and even returned the display to the normal desktop mode.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites