Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Programming Jobs

This topic is 5309 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Does anyone here have a job programming? Especially Games? I was wondering from an employer stand point which would be more important to have? A Bachelors in Computer Science, or a C++ Programming Certificate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
A Bachelors in CS is the MINIMUM to get a programming job (unless you already have a BS and a ton of professional programming experience). You''ll also need some practical experience in the form of internships to stand a reasonable chance. A certificate just is not going to cut it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Neither. The C++ certificate will serve you little for any programming jobs at all. You''ll have much more luck with a bachlor. At least that will teach you how a computer works + algorithms not just the raw material required to make a program bare-bone functional. But even a comp sci. bachlor is not the best you can get to. The best programmers are the ones who can think out a problem by themselves and that requires math. A student in math (although they may not know the machine too much) will typically be much more able to resolve a problem by themselves than a CSI student. most math degree are offered with a concentration in computer science. Some computer scientists think that they''re all that but when it comes down to solving a non-standard problem which was taught in class, they''re stuck.

Just my opinion as an employer!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with AP. These are both just credentials. By themselves, neither of them have nearly as much weight as experience.

Ok, now that we got that out of the way, lets look at reality.

As someone that hires game programmers, if I saw a resume that listed C++ Programming Certificate, I would be inclined to throw it in the trash. Knowing C++ is such a small part of programming. Someone showing this as an accomplishment probably has very little to offer.

In contrast, a BSCS shows that you have been learning about programming for 4 years. Whether or not you actually have any skill remains to be seen, but at least you have spent a significant amount of time learning things.

What you didn''t mention for consideration is a demo. I can''t emphasize how important demos are. Demos show that you have some experience (even if just a little) with some of the issues of game programming. Even if the people you are interviewing don''t want to see the demo, the fact that you have one is a huge plus.

In summary:

BSCS -- good,
C++ Programming Certificate -- bad
demo -- can''t be beat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Right now a BSCS is uesless unless you have 2-3 years experience. Entry-level has fallen off the map. Hell, even internships unofficially require experience. People just want cheap labor. That doesn''t mean a BSCS is useless, but you need to cobble together experience any way you can to make it payoff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jambolo is right; a good demo is priceless when looking for a job. From what I read again and again from people in the games industry, they don''t honestly care what certificates or degrees you have. All that matters is what you can _DO_, not what you have "officially learned", and that should be showcased in your demo.

unkn.Enigma1625

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
I just graduated with a BSCS this year and have three job offers. There is demand for entry level CS majors if you have connections and communication skills. That last part is important. A lot of CS guys spend their waking hours in front of a glowing screen without any other human contact. Then they go to an interview and have no personality and nothing to really talk about. Charisma is very under rated and something that is seriously lacking in the computer field.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Enigma1625
From what I read again and again from people in the games industry, they don''t honestly care what certificates or degrees you have. All that matters is what you can _DO_, not what you have "officially learned", and that should be showcased in your demo.

The problem is, there are a Lot of people looking for jobs, and not many jobs available. And employers don''t necessarily have time to load up every demo they get sent, but they do have time to check your resumé. So naturally they''re gonna look at the demos from people with a degree first.



[ MSVC Fixes | STL Docs | SDL | Game AI | Sockets | C++ Faq Lite | Boost
Asking Questions | Organising code files | My stuff | Tiny XML | STLPort]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I''m going to be a junior next year going to school for computer science and I landed an awesome internship with a video game company. It can be done.

-- Steve --

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I dont know what it is like in other countries, but here i completed a specialised degree in graphics programming, which consisted of real time and pre-rendered graphical techniques. During my degree i had to make alot of ICA''s (incource assesments) i.e. practical projects, which served me well when it came to interviews for a job.

It took me about 6 months after i left university to get a job (i was lazy and wanted some time off for myself), and am now working in a games company in the UK as a graphics programmer.

For me this was the best route into the industry, but every person is not the same. One thing that really does help when you go for an interview, and what other people in this thread are touching on, is to have a REALLY kickass demo. However, for a demo i suggest you make a complete game. It does not have to be a really big game, maybe one level or map, with a proper UI and a begining and end. Why you ask yourself? well it shows not only that you can programme but you have the ability to finish something, which is very important to show when you get an interview. Employes wanna know you can last the distance on a project.

I hope any of what i said helps, if not please feel free to ignore me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just FYI, Typically a 2 year internship, or a 2 year co-op or working in the field programming parttime while going to school doesnt count as the same as 2 full years of experience, its usually half that time, since usually in an internship , co-op or parttime ur working around half full time (over the course of a year, i.e. even if u work 40 hours a week at a internship thats usually just over a summer). So you still need experience, or bite the bullet and work more hours at ur "part-time" programming job while going to school...

and yes a degree over a certificate anyday...
I think the days are quickly leaving where u can get a job programming with no degree, probably can still if you have like 15 years experience, but as a newbie, probably not so much. Especially now a days with the economy sucking...my friens and I all graduated in december, I was lucky to get a job by feb and my other friend got a job finally and starts next week...thoughI had a lot of experience programming while I was going to school, hence probably why I found a job faster than my other friend who just had a good GPA.

Just the way its been here in the southwest..

Oh and I guess employeers think that since CS was soo hot in recent years and that the economy sucks, they can get get away with paying programmers half of what they are worth...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Programmers are only worth what the economy can afford. If the economy changes and managers feel they can pay people less then in previous years, that''s what they''ll pay. As long as there are people willing to take low-paying programming jobs, the industry will continue to pay low rates. This is just ''how it is''. There''s no point looking backwards when applying for a job and seeing that people got payed a lot more for what you''re doing now. Just be thankful that you have the interview. Once the economy heats up you''ll be able to negotiate higher paying jobs. The days of getting a job right out of school that pays $100,000 CDN are over. Sticking with a company to learn skills and then moving to a new company and asking for more pay works well, as does talking with your manager and letting him know you feel undervalued. Don''t be afraid of the low salary provided to junior positions, the experience you gain is invaluable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites